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Tag Archives: Holy Spirit

Unaware Addictions

What if your cell phone was lost and you didn’t have enough money to purchase a replacement? What would happen if a major blackout prevented you from streaming or watching your favorite shows for an entire weekend? If all of your internet passwords were changed without your knowledge, how would you survive without being able to access the worldwide net? How you answer these questions might reveal unaware addictions, formerly oblivious to you.

Let not sin therefore rule as king in your mortal (short-lived, perishable) bodies, to make you yield to its cravings and be subject to its lusts and evil passions. 13 Do not continue offering or yielding your bodily members [and faculties] to sin as instruments (tools) of wickedness. But offer and yield yourselves to God as though you have been raised from the dead to [perpetual] life, and your bodily members [and faculties] to God, presenting them as implements of righteousness, Romans 6:12-13.

The 6th chapter of Romans serves as spiritual assessment to expose the degree to which you indulge your flesh. The apostle Paul asks members of the church at Rome, “how are you currently offering your body?” Paul insinuates that human being are yielding to their flesh instead of keeping in step with the Holy Spirit, Galatians 5:25. If this assessment reveals an addiction, bad habit or weaknesses, what are you going to do to address this concern?

For sin shall not [any longer] exert dominion over you, since now you are not under Law [as slaves], but under grace [as subjects of God’s favor and mercy]. 15 What then [are we to conclude]? Shall we sin because we live not under Law but under God’s favor and mercy? Certainly not! 16 Do you not know that if you continually surrender yourselves to anyone to do his will, you are the slaves of him whom you obey, whether that be to sin, which leads to death, or to obedience which leads to righteousness (right doing and right standing with God)? – Romans 6:14-15

In the passage above, Paul suggests that you are a slave to that which you obey. Perhaps, this explains why so many Americans are enslaved by fleshly cravings. Listening to your body to drink, eat or exercise seems so natural. Yet, what if you are so use to the norm that you have missed out on spiritually blessings? Jesus confesses that the spirit is willing, but the body is weak, Matthew 26:41. May this blog and the passages above inspire you to keep in step with the Holy Spirit rather than indulge your sinful nature.

by Jay Mankus

The Power of the WORD

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus first used the term Logos 600 years before Jesus’ birth. Heraclitus was searching for a term to designate the divine reason or plan which coordinates a changing universe. As written in the Greek Lexicon, λογόs refers to a word uttered by a living voice that embodies a concept or idea. This is the term that the disciple whom Jesus loved uses in the opening chapter of his gospel.

So shall My word be that goes forth out of My mouth: it shall not return to Me void [without producing any effect, useless], but it shall accomplish that which I please and purpose, and it shall prosper in the thing for which I sent it, Isaiah 55:11.

John gets right to his point in the opening verse, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God.” Unlike any other human being, Jesus resided in heaven prior to being conceived by the Holy Spirit in the womb of Mary. Subsequently, John introduces the concept of the trinity, three personalities within one supreme God. Thus, the creator of the universe came down to earth to bring light to an ever darkening world as a living WORD.

Every Scripture is God-breathed (given by His inspiration) and profitable for instruction, for reproof and conviction of sin, for correction of error and discipline in obedience, [and] for training in righteousness (in holy living, in conformity to God’s will in thought, purpose, and action), So that the man of God may be complete and proficient, well fitted and thoroughly equipped for every good work, 2 Timothy 3:16-17.

In his second letter to a teenage pastor, the apostle Paul explains how the Bible was God inspired over several thousand years. The author of Hebrews refers to this book as living and active, like a double edged sword which allows a soldier to move from a defensive to offensive position in one motion. Isaiah, who was sawed in two for his faith, understood the power of God’s Word as described in the passage above. However, the greatest aspect of the Bible is that each time you open these living pages a new message is received, a fresh perspective on life. As you study the Bible in 2020, may you feel and sense the presence of the power of the WORD.

by Jay Mankus

Angels of Deliverance

Deliverance is the action that results in being rescued or set free. Synonyms include emancipation, liberation, redemption and salvation. This term suggests that a group, individuals or a nation is undergoing a dire situation. These predicaments are often so severe that saving yourself isn’t impossible. Thus, there will be moments in life where everyone will need some sort of divine intervention. For those who turn to God when your back is against the wall so to speak, the Bible refers to angels of deliverance.

My help comes from the Lord, Who made heaven and earth. He will not allow your foot to slip or to be moved; He Who keeps you will not slumber. Behold, He who keeps Israel will neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is your keeper; the Lord is your shade on your right hand [the side not carrying a shield], Psalm 121:2-5.

Although the Psalmist does not mention angels by name, God’s nature is revealed in the passage above. This song of ascent reflects upon previous times where the Lord helped either directly or indirectly. As a shepherd, David credits God for overseeing his steps despite walking over hilly terrain, Psalm 18:36. Meanwhile, while you are sleeping, guardian angels are assigned to watch over you day and night, Psalm 91:11. Angel stories continue today as believers share how God shielded them from harm.

The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance (to the full, till it overflows). 11 I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd risks and lays down His [own] life for the sheep, John 10:10-11.

In the New Testament, Jesus reveals who you need deliverance from, an invisible thief who seeks to steal, kill and destroy souls. Using the analogy of a good shepherd fighting off attacks from wolves, Jesus uncovers God’s plan for deliverance. Predicting his death on a cross, Jesus’ sinless life and sacrifice was necessary to restore that which Adam lost, Luke 19:10. After Jesus’ resurrection and ascension into heaven, the Holy Spirit was sent to earth along with angels to ensure that deliverance continues today.

by Jay Mankus

The Oracles of God

From a biblical perspective, an oracle refers to a priest or priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from God. Whenever a forefather, judge or king was about to make an important decision in the Old Testament, prophets and seers were requested. Depending upon the oracle received, these leaders would base their ultimate decision upon these words of wisdom.

Then what advantage remains to the Jew? [How is he favored?] Or what is the value or benefit of circumcision? Much in every way. To begin with, to the Jews were entrusted the oracles (the brief communications, the intentions, the utterances) of God, Romans 3:1-2.

In the New Testament, the apostle Paul uses logic and reason to justify the Jewish practice of circumcision. As individuals follow the Torah, Old Testament laws relayed to Israel from Moses, spiritual insight is gained. However, this process is exercised by talking steps of faith, not by sight. As the faithful follow their spiritual convictions, brief communication, intentions and utterances from God are received.

And He said, Go out and stand on the mount before the Lord. And behold, the Lord passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains and broke in pieces the rocks before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind; and after the wind an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake; 12 And after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire; and after the fire [a sound of gentle stillness and] a still, small voice, 1 Kings 19:11-12.

It’s not uncommon to feel like the prophet Elijah in the passage above. There are moments, periods and time when God is silent and believers feel all alone, desperate for comfort and direction. During this ordeal, Elijah withdrew to a cave to contemplate his next step, In the minutes that followed, a series of weather related events got Elijah’s attention. Despite the wonder and awe of these natural disasters, God was not behind these events. As Elijah’s spirit grew impatient, an oracle of God appeared in the form of a whisper. May this story encourage you to be ready for the next oracle to be spoken via the power of the Holy Spirit.

by Jay Mankus

Afraid of What the Silence Might Reveal

Driving in a car without listening to music, a podcast or talk radio seems odd. Unless of course your car’s stereo system isn’t working. This makes me wonder why human beings have grown accustom to filling in any brief moments of silence with conversation, some sort of electronic game or texting. Perhaps, individuals are afraid of what the silence might reveal?

He says, “Be still, and know that I am God; I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth.”11 The Lord Almighty is with us;
the God of Jacob is our fortress, Psalm 46:10-11.

To avoid any bad news, heartbreak or humbling reflection, minds race to fill in the blank moments daily. As you wake up, thoughts lead many to check cell phones thinking, “maybe I missed a phone call or important text?” Others click on the news to catch up on current events to pass the time before work. Meanwhile, overachievers will check emails to prepare their minds for what to expect today. As you make your way toward school or work, did you pause to consider what God wanted you to do or say?

Very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where he prayed. 36 Simon and his companions went to look for him, 37 and when they found him, they exclaimed: “Everyone is looking for you!” 38 Jesus replied, “Let us go somewhere else—to the nearby villages—so I can preach there also. That is why I have come.” 39 So he traveled throughout Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and driving out demons, Mark 1:35-39.

During the third and final day of my current Esther Fast, I received a rhema from God. Like a whisper from the Holy Spirit, I came face to face with my fears, afraid of what the silence might reveal. Beside not living up to my potential as a leader, selfishness has kept me from being a servant of the Lord. Not having a church family to call home, I’ve taken several steps backwards spiritually. My prayer for 2020 is that I finally surround myself with a community of believers to build up my wife Leanne and family. While the news may not be what you want to hear, don’t be afraid of silence anymore.

by Jay Mankus

An Invisible Christmas Gift

The commercialization of Christmas in the 21st century has blinded minds from an invisible gift. If you can escape from the advertisements of cars, diamond rings and other high priced items, Christmas is not about buying and exchanging gifts that many can’t afford. Rather, the mass of Christ is about accepting a promised child, the Messiah, who came to save you from your earthly imperfections.

I indeed baptize you in (with) water because of repentance [that is, because of your changing your minds for the better, heartily amending your ways, with abhorrence of your past sins]. But He Who is coming after me is mightier than I, Whose sandals I am not worthy or fit to take off or carry; He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire, Matthew 3:11.

One of Jesus’ disciples records a conversation between John the Baptist and Jesus in the passage above and below. At this point in the first century, many sensed that John was the Messiah in waiting. When approached with this notion, John corrected this misnomer, explaining that he is merely preparing the way. John uses baptism to illustrate the difference between his ministry and the promised One to come.

But John protested strenuously, having in mind to prevent Him, saying, It is I who have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me? 15 But Jesus replied to him, Permit it just now; for this is the fitting way for [both of] us to fulfill all righteousness [that is, to perform completely whatever is right]. Then he permitted Him. 16 And when Jesus was baptized, He went up at once out of the water; and behold, the heavens were opened, and he [John] saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting on Him, Matthew 3:14-16.

The purpose of any baptism is a public expression of an inner faith. While John’s baptism was centered around confession and forgiveness, Jesus promises an invisible gift in John 16:13. What his disciples did not understand at the time, this gift would transfer power from priests to those who enter into a personal relationship with Jesus, Romans 10:9-11. You won’t find this gift under a Christmas tree. Rather, when you find Jesus, access is gained, Romans 5:1-5, with a goal of keeping is step with the Holy Spirit daily. May 2020 be a year where the Holy Spirit awakens your soul to this invisible Christmas gift.

by Jay Mankus

Taking a Turn for the Worse

The expression “taking a turn for the worse” often applies to someone’s health. Whenever an individual experiences an accident, battles cancer or recovers from a major operation, conditions can improve or deteriorate at a moments notice. When a celebrity, former president or icon makes headlines due to a medical condition, the words taking a turn for the worse is a polite way of saying that this person is about to die.

But the high places were not removed. Yet Asa’s heart was blameless with the Lord all his days, 1 Kings 15:14.

The Bible refers to a different kind of taking a turn for the worse. Solomon refers to human hearts as the wellspring of life, Proverbs 4:23. Thus, when spiritual leaders take a turn for the worse, their hearts grow cold. This condition may be attributed to backsliding, busyness, a lack of time spent praying, worshiping or studying the Bible daily. As individuals slowly drift apart from God, hearts lose their excitement, fire and passion for serving the Lord.

And many false prophets will rise up and deceive and lead many into error. 12 And the love of the great body of people will grow cold because of the multiplied lawlessness and iniquity, Matthew 24:11-12.

In the first century, Jesus makes a prediction about the future. As deception and error occur, persuaded by false prophets, the love of many will grow cold. Hearts that grow cold will pursue lawlessness and iniquity. In the case of King Asa, he failed to remove altars, idols and temples dedicated to secular gods and goddess. This inaction eventually led future Jews astray. To avoid a similar fate, refuel your heart with the Holy Spirit, Galatians 5:25 so that your spiritual life doesn’t take a turn for the worse.

by Jay Mankus

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