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Tag Archives: Prayer

Afraid of What the Silence Might Reveal

Driving in a car without listening to music, a podcast or talk radio seems odd. Unless of course your car’s stereo system isn’t working. This makes me wonder why human beings have grown accustom to filling in any brief moments of silence with conversation, some sort of electronic game or texting. Perhaps, individuals are afraid of what the silence might reveal?

He says, “Be still, and know that I am God; I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth.”11 The Lord Almighty is with us;
the God of Jacob is our fortress, Psalm 46:10-11.

To avoid any bad news, heartbreak or humbling reflection, minds race to fill in the blank moments daily. As you wake up, thoughts lead many to check cell phones thinking, “maybe I missed a phone call or important text?” Others click on the news to catch up on current events to pass the time before work. Meanwhile, overachievers will check emails to prepare their minds for what to expect today. As you make your way toward school or work, did you pause to consider what God wanted you to do or say?

Very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where he prayed. 36 Simon and his companions went to look for him, 37 and when they found him, they exclaimed: “Everyone is looking for you!” 38 Jesus replied, “Let us go somewhere else—to the nearby villages—so I can preach there also. That is why I have come.” 39 So he traveled throughout Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and driving out demons, Mark 1:35-39.

During the third and final day of my current Esther Fast, I received a rhema from God. Like a whisper from the Holy Spirit, I came face to face with my fears, afraid of what the silence might reveal. Beside not living up to my potential as a leader, selfishness has kept me from being a servant of the Lord. Not having a church family to call home, I’ve taken several steps backwards spiritually. My prayer for 2020 is that I finally surround myself with a community of believers to build up my wife Leanne and family. While the news may not be what you want to hear, don’t be afraid of silence anymore.

by Jay Mankus

How Happiness Happens

A recent survey found that only 1 out 3 Americans are truly happy with their current life. While this feeling of contentment is a temporary state, only a third of those who participated were found to be joyful and satisfied. This makes me wonder, how does happiness happen? How can individuals use the beginning of a new year and decade to turn their frown around?

Give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you,” Luke 6:38.

Best selling author Max Lucado’s newest book provides biblical insight to explain How Happiness Happens. While watching Fox and Friends over my Christmas Break, I caught Lucado’s interview to promo his latest project. Based upon this brief segment, Lucado draws upon Jesus’ teaching on giving, “it’s better to give than receive.”

One gives freely, yet grows all the richer; another withholds what he should give, and only suffers want. Whoever brings blessing will be enriched, and one who waters will himself be watered, Proverbs 11:24-25.

King Solomon provides another perspective on giving in the passage above. It’s unclear if Solomon is speaking about his own life or merely referring to the sowing principle. Regardless of this context, those who learn to freely give without expecting something in return will be blessed by God and others. As 2020 commences tomorrow, my prayer is that you may begin to understand how happiness happens.

by Jay Mankus

Uniting Communion with Prayer

The word unite refers to coming or bringing together for a common purpose or action. In a letter to the church at Corinth, Paul explains the meaning and purpose of communion. Whenever you partake in communion, the passage below is either read or summarized. Yet, if you exclude prayer from communion, there is a key element being overlooked.

For every time you eat this bread and drink this cup, you are representing and signifying and proclaiming the fact of the Lord’s death until He comes [again], 1 Corinthians 11:26.

Perhaps, first century churches began taking communion services for granted, going through the motions without any personal reflection. The passage below serves as a warning, a reminder to take this sacrament seriously. To avoid this careless mistake, Paul urges readers to thoroughly examine yourself prior to eating the bread and drinking your cup.

So then whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in a way that is unworthy [of Him] will be guilty of [profaning and sinning against] the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a man [thoroughly] examine himself, and [only when he has done] so should he eat of the bread and drink of the cup, 1 Corinthians 11:27-28.

While in college, one of my mentors served as a pastor in a rural area. Many of his members took this passage to the extreme, not showing up at all on Sunday for church, feeling unworthy and unprepared to take communion. After a couple of months, pastor Jack stopped announcing when communion would be served, changing the weeks every month. The next time you partake in communion, prepare yourself with prayer so that contrite hearts will begin to purge sin from your life.

by Jay Mankus

The Time Share Theory

The term timeshare was coined in Great Britain during the 1960’s. This vacation system where a property with a divided form of ownership or use rights became popular after World War II. The downside to modern timeshares is that the exact price varies depending upon the week that you own and maintenance fees often increase every year. In addition, trying to sell your timeshare can be extremely difficult which explains the rise in companies devoted to selling unwanted timeshares.

To everything there is a season, and a time for every matter or purpose under heaven: A time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to pluck up what is planted, A time to kill and a time to heal, a time to break down and a time to build up, A time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance, Ecclesiastes 3:1-4.

The Time Share Theory is based upon the decisions that you make in life. The choices you make daily will reveal your priorities. During a portion of the Sermon on the Mount detailed in Matthew 6:19-24, Jesus uses the analogy, “where your treasure is, your heart will be also,” Matthew 6:19-24. Thus, whether on purpose or subliminally, habits will determine how you spend your time each week.

Just as the Son of Man came not to be waited on but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many [the price paid to set them free], Matthew 20:28.

A disciple from the tribe of Levi unveils Jesus’ time share theory. According to Matthew in the passage above, Jesus viewed each day as an opportunity to serve to God. John Marks shares a story how an early morning time praying by Jesus changed and shifted what was previous scheduled, Mark 1:35-39. If your daily goal is to seize the day, how your share your time will determine the outcome. The only question remaining is will you be more like Ebenezer Scrooge this Christmas season or more like Jesus?

by Jay Mankus

Prayer Should be Sensed; Not Just Promised

After I accepted Jesus as my Savior on December 4th, 1984, I began my exploratory stage of Christianity. I started attending a local youth group in the middle of my sophomore year of high school. This decision created a desire to draw closer to God as I couldn’t get enough church events. Soon I joined an accountability group, followed by a Bible Study and sharing group. The only downside to these experiences is that I often found myself promising to pray for people, but forgetting to actually take the time to pray after leaving.

Also when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the corners of the streets, that they may be seen by people. Truly I tell you, they have their reward in full already, Matthew 6:5.

During a sermon on the Mount of Olives, Jesus gives two examples of prayer. The first illustration conveys how not to pray. The second reveals that prayer is meant to be an intimate conversation with God. Thus, the first thing you need to do is withdraw to a quiet place, away from all the distractions in life. The final sentence in the passage below suggests that God rewards those who spend time alone with God in prayer. From my own personal experiences over the past 35 years, powerful prayer is sensed by those you are praying for and within the place where you are praying.

But when you pray, go into your [most] private room, and, closing the door, pray to your Father, Who is in secret; and your Father, Who sees in secret, will reward you in the open, Matthew 6:6.

The 2015 film War Room illustrates how lives can be transformed when Christians get serious about prayer. Unfortunately, procrastination cause many to take a casual approach to prayer, waiting until accidents, emergencies or tragedy happen before pouring out their hearts to God. While my own War Room has become my bedroom, Jesus eludes to using a closet to pray. Whatever place you find and make as your own, make sure that your prayers are sensed and not just promised.

by Jay Mankus

Pillars of Prayer

When I visit a tourist destination, rarely do I say, “look at that pillar!” This tall vertical structure of stone, wood, or metal, used as a support for a building often goes unnoticed. Yet, without these crucial supports, buildings will collapse, not able to stand the test of time. In ancient Greece, pillars were center pieces of famous landmarks that still stand today.

And as He saw one single leafy fig tree above the roadside, He went to it but He found nothing but leaves on it [seeing that in the fig tree the fruit appears at the same time as the leaves]. And He said to it, Never again shall fruit grow on you! And the fig tree withered up at once, Matthew 21:19.

During an early morning walk, Jesus introduced his disciples to pillars of prayer. When an unproductive fig tree did not offer any fruit for their hungry stomachs, Jesus cursed it, immediately withering in front of them. This miracle inspired disciples to ascertain about the power of prayer. The first pillar is faith. This must be accompanied by an unwavering reliance on God. The second pillar is belief. This is accomplished by removing any doubt from your mind, trusting in the God who created the mountains.

When the disciples saw it, they marveled greatly and asked, How is it that the fig tree has withered away all at once? And Jesus answered them, Truly I say to you, if you have faith (a firm relying trust) and do not doubt, you will not only do what has been done to the fig tree, but even if you say to this mountain, Be taken up and cast into the sea, it will be done. And whatever you ask for in prayer, having faith and [really] believing, you will receive, Matthew 21:20-22.

From personal experience, my mind tends to get in the way of prayers from being answered. It’s one thing to believe in the power of prayer, but Christians shouldn’t treat God like Santa Claus using prayer as a wish list. Instead, faith and belief must go hand and hand, yielding to God’s will. Yet, this shouldn’t hold you back, knocking on God’s door over and over again like the persistent widow. Prayer can be complicated, especially when prayers go unanswered. Nonetheless, when individuals don’t limit what heaven can do, you’ll be surprised just like the disciples above.

by Jay Mankus

The Proximity of Your Relationship

Proximity is nearness in space and time. In the context of a relationship, proximity can include accessibility, closeness, presence or vicinity. Depending upon an individual’s personal desire and feelings, proximity will draw near or withdraw and fade away. As love is conceived within human hearts, couples will marry to ensure that proximity is never an issue again.

And we have the prophetic word [made] firmer still. You will do well to pay close attention to it as to a lamp shining in a dismal (squalid and dark) place, until the day breaks through [the gloom] and the Morning Star rises comes into being) in your hearts. [Yet] first [you must] understand this, that no prophecy of Scripture is [a matter] of any personal or private or special interpretation (loosening, solving), 2 Peter 1:19-20.

Moses makes an intriguing correlation about proximity in the Old Testament. Deuteronomy 28 suggests that your proximity to God will influence how blessed or cursed your life will be on earth. Those who closely listen to God’s voice by carefully obeying God’s commandments will be rewarded with blessings. These blessings are dependent upon one’s ability to heed God’s calling via the Holy Spirit. This fact should make all believers eager to reside in close proximity with God.

For no prophecy ever originated because some man willed it [to do so—it never came by human impulse], but men spoke from God who were borne along (moved and impelled) by the Holy Spirit, 2 Peter 1:21.

Unfortunately, earthly distractions, human impulses and temporary pleasures cause me to weekly leave God’s presence and wander away from the Lord. The further I drift, replacing my time with God for self fulfilling practices, blessings disappear. Instead, trials in the form of curses often block and prevent me from drawing near to God again. Although no one wants to accept that they are living under a curse, disobedience to the biblical commands, decrees and principles will result in unfortunate events. May this blog inspire you to improve your proximity with God by drawing near the Lord to praise and worship the Great I Am daily.

by Jay Mankus

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