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Tag Archives: Prayer

Fighting Off Worry with Prayer

As a parent of teenagers, it’s not uncommon to receive a troubling text or phone call about a developing situation. While driving home from a friend’s house last night, my wife answered her cell phone. I could hear my son’s voice as Daniel was upset about a disturbing letter. Focused on driving, I tried to keep my mind on the road as the winds of worry began to consume my soul.

Keep on asking and it will be given you; keep on seeking and you will find; keep on knocking [reverently] and [the door] will be opened to you. For everyone who keeps on asking receives; and he who keeps on seeking finds; and to him who keeps on knocking, [the door] will be opened, Matthew 7:7-8.

After getting home after 10 pm, nothing could be done to resolve this issue until Friday morning. The letter my son received claimed that he didn’t complete his defense driving course over the summer which triggered a series consequences. Until my wife called our attorney in the morning, nothing could fix this error. Thus, my son and I remained restless, unable to sleep last night.

And Jesus answered them, Truly I say to you, if you have faith (a] firm relying trust) and do not doubt, you will not only do what has been done to the fig tree, but even if you say to this mountain, Be taken up and cast into the sea, it will be done. And whatever you ask for in prayer, having faith and [really] believing, you will receive, Matthew 21:21-22.

As I finally sat down in bed before sunrise, the verses above raced through my mind. The more I thought about these passages on prayer, I became emboldened, claiming these promises in a moving movement of prayer. Part of my didn’t want to be disappointed, but an inner faith fought off worry with prayer. When I woke up before noon, I was excited to hear that this mistake was corrected and no court hearing was necessary. The past 24 hours have taught me a valuable lesson, fighting off worry with prayer.

by Jay Mankus

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Recognizing God as Your Ally

The term ally is often associated with foreign policy. When a country or state is at odds with an adversary, leaders will reach out to like minded nations to form a verbal or written allegiance. These politically formed allies become partners by cooperating in times of need, participating in joint military operations and supporting one another when unforeseen events arise. Faithful allies become colleagues, friends and helpers to make the world a better place to live.

But some Jews arrived there from Antioch and Iconium; and having persuaded the people and won them over, they stoned Paul and [afterward] dragged him out of the town, thinking that he was dead. But the disciples formed a circle about him, and he got up and went back into the town; and on the morrow he went on with Barnabas to Derbe, Acts 14:19-20.

While on trial for his faith, the apostle Paul refers God as his ally. When you take a look at the numerous times Paul’s life was in danger, the Lord always sent an angel, believer or concerned citizen to come the rescue. In the passage above, Paul was stoned, left for dead by his accusers. Instead of accepting that Paul would die, the disciples formed a circle around Paul to prevent any further attacks. Although Luke doesn’t mention prayer, I’m sure one, several or all of these godly men hoped and prayed for a speedy recovery, to restore Paul’s health quickly.

[But] to this day I have had the help which comes from God [as my ally], and so I stand here testifying to small and great alike, asserting nothing beyond what the prophets and Moses declared would come to pass, Acts 26:22.

Paul’s testimony in the passage above makes me wonder if I truly view God as my ally. While I see God as my friend and Savior, genuine allies cooperate with or help one another in a particular activity. This particular activity would be fulfilling the great commission, Acts 1:8, by using my God given gifts. Similar to American allies, I go through periods where I am missing due to in action. The flesh, a.k.a. the sinful nature has a way of persuading distracted souls to become self-centered, breaking your allegiance to God. Paul devotes two chapters of the Bible to this, Romans 7 and 8. May this blog inspire you to rekindle your relationship with God by becoming a better ally with the Creator of the universe.

by Jay Mankus

Unmasking Nightmares

As Halloween 2019 arrives, will the events of today result in nightmares tomorrow? Nightmares are triggered by anxiety, stress or trauma. These unpleasant dreams can range from reliving a scene from a recently watched horror movie to strong emotional unrest within your mind. The most severe nightmares are brought on by posttraumatic stress disorder. Engaging in military combat, coping with abuse or witnessing a death can make every night like a real life Nightmare on Elm Street.

Casting the whole of your care [all your anxieties, all your worries, all your concerns, once and for all] on Him, for He cares for you affectionately and cares about you watchfully, 1 Peter 5:7.

At the beginning of chapter 5, a former disciple of Jesus addresses the sufferings individuals will experience on earth. Anyone who makes the decision to follow Jesus is at greater risk. For example, the person who wrote this letter was crucified up-side down for his faith. When anxieties, concerns and worries overwhelm your soul, Peter urges Christians to cast their cares at the feet of Christ. As nightmares begin to stir your mind into a tizzy, cry out to God in prayer to stop these brain tremors in their tracks.

Be well balanced (temperate, sober of mind), be vigilant and cautious at all times; for that enemy of yours, the devil, roams around like a lion roaring [in fierce hunger], seeking someone to seize upon and devour, 1 Peter 5:8.

Just when I thought it was safe, Peter drops a bombshell about a spiritual danger that exists. As a child, I loved to watch Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. One of the episodes illustrated the passage above as lions recognized, separated and wore down weak animals who were surrounded and killed. This passage unmasks Satan’s schemes on earth. One of the ways people get worn down is through nightmares. When bodies don’t get enough sleep, minds are weakened, affecting how you function. If you want to fight back, the apostle Paul suggests using spiritual weapons to protect your mind, 2 Corinthians 10:3-5. As believers begin to put on the armor of God, Ephesians 6:12-18, minds will receive the protection you need to unmask nightmares as an attack from the evil one.

by Jay Mankus

From a Great American Melting Pot to Toxicity Boiling Over

School Hose Rock was an educational campaign geared toward children, kids and teenagers watching cartoons every Saturday morning. The Great American Melting Pot commercial was a successful slogan to embrace immigrants who came to America to start a new life in this country. School House Rock ads were a series of educational songs which ran for 12 years from 1973 to 1985.

Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance, Proverbs 1:5.

Unfortunately, the introduction of social media in 1997 has gradually turned a great American melting pot into toxic sites boiling over with hatred. Twitter has the become a cesspool of bitterness with other liberal sites not that far behind, allowing false accusations, lies and slander to continue daily. This atmosphere and climate has created a feeding frenzy for anti-conservative beliefs to spread.

An intelligent heart acquires knowledge, and the ear of the wise seeks knowledge, Proverbs 18:15.

Perhaps, the only way to reverse this ominous trend is reminding millennials of the School House Rock campaign. Meanwhile, the public educational system needs to abandon Common Core by returning to an emphasis on reading, writing and arithmetic. In addition, institutions of higher education must reverse course from its current protesting and victimology agenda. When classrooms return to places of learning, toxicity can be defeated if hearts and minds are devoted to prayer.

by Jay Mankus

What Do You Remember?

A 2016 research study has shown that children exposed to trauma don’t forget it, as previously believed. In an attempt to suppress these painful experiences, these individuals engage in denial as a defense mechanism. These findings peaked my interest as I blocked out most of second grade. While writing a paper for Childhood Development in college, I had to interview my parents about my behavior as a child. As I asked my mother a series of question, I began to realize why I tried to conceal these memories. My stuttering had become so severe that even my own mother regularly couldn’t understand what I was trying to say.

Remember not the sins of my youth or my transgressions; according to your steadfast love remember me, for the sake of your goodness, O Lord! – Psalm 25:7

When my father was transferred to Delaware a year later, this move was a blessing in disguise. The neighborhood in north Wilmington, Delaware that I called home until college was amazing. While some friends like Brad moved away a few years after I arrived, Jeanette, Steven and Richie helped make this a smooth transition. Although I still battled spouts of stammering and stuttering, this community became like an extended family. Every summer I couldn’t wait to get up so that I could play outside until dark. On rainy days, Atari and epic games of Monopoly passed the time. These interactions in North Minister fueled my love for competition and sports.

Remember for my good, O my God, all that I have done for this people, Nehemiah 5:19.

While fond memories from your past are nice to cling to, the Bible reveals what individuals should remember. The Psalmist writes a prayer for change, seeking to forget the wayward decisions of their past. Meanwhile, a servant of the king pleads that God remembers only the good that he has done. The apostle Paul reveals God’s ultimate Paul in 2 Corinthians 5:21. Once the perfect lamb of God (Jesus) died on a cross for our sins and rose from the dead, God no longer sees our imperfections. Thus, this is what our heavenly father wants individuals to remember while residing on earth.

by Jay Mankus

To Impeach or Not to Impeach?

Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body, the House of Representatives in the United States, levels charges against a government official. A decision to impeach a government official is equivalent to an indictment in criminal law. This act does not actually remove an official from office. Rather, this statement of charges is voted on by the House. If enough votes are received, the Senate conducts a trial based upon articles of impeachment vetoed upon. The last president to be impeached by Congress was Bill Clinton in 1998.

So Jesus was saying to the Jews who had believed Him, “If you abide in My word [continually obeying My teachings and living in accordance with them, then] you are truly My disciplesm John 8:31.

While this decision more than 20 years ago seemed logical at the time for Republican leaders, impeaching Clinton back fired resulting in Democratic wins at the ballet box during the 1998 elections. The impeachment frenzy was revitalized this past week, bombarding viewers on cable news and setting social media on fire. After reports were leaked of a conversion between President Trump and the new Ukrainian president, Democratic leaders have initiated an impeachment inquiry. Meanwhile, Republican members of Congress claim this decision is merely an attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 presidential election.

And you will know the truth [regarding salvation], and the truth will set you free [from the penalty of sin],” John 8:32.

As an observer of this political drama, our justice system is on the verge of collapse. The concept of innocent until proven guilty apparently does not apply to President Trump, a former Democrat who is now the leader of the Republican party. High ranking progressive leaders continue to presume that our 45th president is guilty without any clear evidence of a crime committed. Whether it’s Russian interference, endless classified leaks or this new Ukrainian phone call, certain Democratic leaders are itching to impeach President Trump. Yet, without any concrete evidence, history could repeat itself in 2020. As concerned citizens watch this chaos, all you and I can do is pray for clarity so that the truth will set Congress free.

by Jay Mankus

Stopping to Take a Deep Breathe

The idiom “taking a deep breathe” refers to pausing for a moment to calm and compose yourself. If you work in a stressful environment like me, taking a personal day or vacation is essential to prevent emotional or physical burnout from occurring. Removing yourself from deadlines, hectic circumstances and pressure for a while is good for your own mental health.

“Be still and know (recognize, understand) that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations! I will be exalted in the earth,” Psalm 46:10.

One of the Psalms of the Bible is entitled God the Refuge His people. This chapter is dedicated to the chief musician. The sons of Korah wrote this song, Psalm 46, set to soprano voices. The end of this piece contains one of the most famous and quoted stanzas of the Bible. When disappointment, hardships or trials begin to stress you out, the Psalmist urges believers to slow down by being still before God.

The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our stronghold [our refuge, our high tower], Psalm 46:11.

No matter how many friends or relationships you may have, there will always be at least one moment in time where no one will know what to say to you. When comfort can not be found by human means, the Lord is always available. Thus, when you reach a point of despair, stop to take a deep breathe. As you do, pour out your heart to God in prayer so that Selah is achieved, a peace that surpasses all understanding.

by Jay Mankus

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