RSS Feed

Tag Archives: a spirit of confession

Let Us Come Forward in Truth

In the days of Little House on the Prairie and Let it to Beaver, television attempted to present a moral or truth to viewers in each episode. While not every message was based on the Bible, America was a much more conservative culture. With each passing generation, executives and writers began to push the envelope further and further. Modern streaming services and series are a byproduct of this moral decay.

Let us all come forward and draw near with true (honest and sincere) hearts in unqualified assurance and absolute conviction engendered by faith (by [b]that leaning of the entire human personality on God in absolute trust and confidence in His power, wisdom, and goodness), having our hearts sprinkled and purified from a guilty (evil) conscience and our bodies cleansed with pure water, Hebrews 10:22.

Whenever anyone makes an error, mistake or outright sins, the Bible encourages individuals who have messed up to come forward in truth. Unfortunately, telling the truth is discouraged in many cultures; seen as a form of betrayal like a nark or snitch. Yet, in the passage above, faith involves laying everything on the line. Regardless of how you may feel, honesty remains the best policy.

Confess to one another therefore your faults (your slips, your false steps, your offenses, your sins) and pray [also] for one another, that you may be healed and restored [to a spiritual tone of mind and heart]. The earnest (heartfelt, continued) prayer of a righteous man makes tremendous power available [dynamic in its working], James 5:16.

My favorite class while attending Seminary was Revival and Revivalism. One of our textbooks studied the Great Awakenings. The second great awakening began when a young man felt compared to come up on stage and began to publicly confess his sins. When someone comes forward in truth, a spirit of confession can transform an entire congregation. Therefore, the next time you blow it big time, don’t be afraid to pour out your heart so that healing and restoration can begin.

by Jay Mankus

Sins in the Dark Brought to Light

If you were asleep the past couple months, you missed a life long worth of scandals.  Every day stories are breaking about affairs, inappropriate relations or sexual assaults.  Whether you’re a celebrity, member of the media or school teacher, transgressions committed in darkness have been brought to the light.  I’m not sure why this is occurring all at once, but perhaps a spirit of confession has inspired guilty consciences to come clean.

Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy, Proverbs 28:13.

Despite the powerful messages recorded in the Bible, each was written by fallen individuals.  Abraham had a tendency to lie rather than trust God.  David committed adultery, got a married woman pregnant then gave orders to have her husband killed.  Peter talked a good game, but when push came to shove, he publicly denied knowing Jesus three times.  One of the mysterious ways God works is through convicting hearts of actions in direct conflict with biblical principles.  Those who conceal that which is hidden will not prosper.

If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you withhold forgiveness from any, it is withheld, John 20:23.

Through all the dirty laundry that is aired regularly, I do see one positive outcome of this ugly part of American history.  The only way to truly heal is through the act of penance.  While attending seminary, I took a class called Revival and Revivalism.  This course studied the Great Awakenings and it’s impact on Great Britain and the United States.  Surprisingly, each was started by young people bearing their souls in public, revealing deeds of darkness of their past.  This act of honesty stirred hearts to do the same.  While America may seem like it’s falling apart, perhaps sins in the dark brought to light may serve as inspiration to ignite another great awakening.

by Jay Mankus

 

Confessions from a Complainaholic

I must admit that it doesn’t take much to set me off.  The sad part is that I don’t even need to be around other people to express my frustrations.  Whenever I am driving to work, I become enraged, pointing out every little imperfection made by other drivers.  While sitting in a pew at church last Sunday, I came to a realization.  My name is Jay and I am a complainaholic.

Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you, 1 Thessalonians 5:18.

Perhaps, I have become a product of the environment in which I live.  Residing within an hour of Philadelphia. aka Negadelphia, I vocalize what I hear, negative comments.  On the eve of Thanksgiving, my human nature is at war with how God wants me to behave.  Thus, I am stuck in the mud, trying alter my current state of disappointment toward a Christ like attitude.  This transformation requires divine intervention.

Giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, Ephesians 5:20.

After reading a series a verses in the Bible, I have discovered the power of Thanksgiving.  On my first day back to work, I began to sing songs of praise, repeating the chorus from worship songs earlier in the day.  This simple adjustment enabled me to become more like a servant than a constant complainer.  I still have a long road of recovery ahead, but for now I plan at taking things one day at a time, praying that a spirit of Thanksgiving will replace my complainaholic nature.

by Jay Mankus

 

 

 

1799

If you talk to family, parents or grand parents about their past, you might find a pattern within each conversation.  There is a tendency for previous generations to believe they had it worse than you.  While this may be true, there is something present day has in common with a specific date in time.  If you research the spiritual climate of 1799, you will find a faith on the verge of collapse.

What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done, and there is nothing new under the sun, Ecclesiastes 1:9.

Although I never completed a master’s in theology due to my eye condition, I did experience a few remarkable seminary courses.  One of my favorites was Revival and Revivalism, a class which studied the history of America from the perspective of the first great awakening.  Beginning in 1799, I was surprised by persecution that existed at this time.  College campuses had mock communions, Christians met in secret afraid of ridicule and church attendance plummeted to all time lows.  If I didn’t know any better, this sounds like today.

Now these things happened to them as an example, but they were written down for our instruction, on whom the end of the ages has come, 1 Corinthians 10:11.

Nonetheless, when the culture begins to persecute believers one of two things happen: denial or revival.  In the case of 1799, the climate was ripe for revival which was ushered in through a series of concerts of prayer, tent meetings and a spirit of confession starting in 1800.  Perhaps, America is prime for another awakening based upon the ongoing drama over Donald Trump’s election in November.  As Inaugural Day 2017 draws near, may Christians across America take a bended knee, crying out to God in prayer for a similar outcome.

by Jay Mankus

 

 

%d bloggers like this: