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Tag Archives: the Declaration of Independence

The Genius of Creation

One of George Mason’s nicknames is the “Father of the Bill of Rights.” According to historians, it was Mason who proposed the language mentioned in the First Amendment. Using a Christian reference in the Bible, “All men have an equal, natural and unalienable right to the free exercise of religion.” While secular and revisionist historians continue to suggest that America wasn’t founded on biblical principles, the genius of God’s creation has left several breadcrumbs inside the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

God said, Let Us [Father, Son, and Holy Spirit] make mankind in Our image, after Our likeness, and let them have complete authority over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, the [tame] beasts, and over all of the earth, and over everything that creeps upon the earth. 27 So God created man in His own image, in the image and likeness of God He created him; male and female He created them. 28 And God blessed them and said to them, Be fruitful, multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it [using all its vast resources in the service of God and man]; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, the birds of the air, and over every living creature that moves upon the earth, Genesis 1:26-28.

As America struggles with civil and racial unrest, the Bible is full of solutions to unite souls. In the passage above, Moses reveals that men and women were created in God’s own image. The Our refers to the Holy Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. This collaboration suggests an agreement, content with Creation. This unity carries over to the New Testament as Jesus came to live, die, and rise again so that all nations and religions could come together again. Unfortunately, there are invisible forces that cause human beings to fight one another instead of the real enemy, Ephesians 6:12.

For as many [of you] as were baptized into Christ [into a spiritual union and communion with Christ, the Anointed One, the Messiah] have put on (clothed yourselves with) Christ. 28 There is [now no distinction] neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is not male and female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus, Galatians 3:27-28.

The apostle Paul writes about the unity of Christ in letters to Colosse and Galatia. Each of these letters possess a common theme, unity that is available in Christ. When you fully surrender to God, giving up your own desires and wants, unity is made possible. When this maturation process is complete, you take on a new identity in Christ, 2 Corinthians 5:21-22. Unfortunately, many Christians never fully yield total control, Subsequently, unity does not occur in many churches as division and factions seek self promotion. If you want to experience the genius of Creation, hand over the reigns of your life to Jesus, Matthew 16:24-27.

by Jay Mankus

The Tears of Lady Liberty

The Statue of Liberty was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi. The metal framework of this landmark was built by Gustave Eiffel. This gift from France was dedicated on October 28, 1886. Three years later, Eiffel completed his own masterpiece in Paris, France. Unfortunately, the first symbol of the Statue of Liberty has been forgotten. Initially, the purpose of this erection of Lady Liberty served as a seal of the friendship between France and the United States. At her feet is a broken chain of slavery designed as a symbol of freedom. Meanwhile, The inscription on the tablet she is holding contains JULY IV MDCCLXXVI, the day of the Declaration of Independence for the United States.

In [this] freedom Christ has made us free [and completely liberated us]; stand fast then, and do not be hampered and held ensnared and submit again to a yoke of slavery [which you have once put off], Galatians 5:1.

Between 1886 and 1924, nearly 14 million immigrants entered the United States through the New York Bay on their way to Ellis Island. The Statue of Liberty was a reassuring sign that achieving the American dream was now a possibility for new arrivals. Ellis Island became the United States’ busiest immigrant inspection station for 62 years from 1892 until 1954. To those entering this body of water at night, the uplifted torch of Lady Liberty was a welcoming sign and was meant to enlighten those who passed by. As the 250th anniversary draws near, revisionist historians are quickly disposing of America’s rich history. A day doesn’t go by without news of another statue removed or threatened from a downtown area. If this trend continues, there will be nothing left to remind citizens of America’s past mistakes and victories.

For you, brethren, were [indeed] called to freedom; only [do not let your] freedom be an incentive to your flesh and an opportunity or excuse [for selfishness], but through love you should serve one another. 14 For the whole Law [concerning human relationships] is complied with in the one precept, You shall love your neighbor as [you do] yourself, Galatians 5:13-14.

While the tears of Lady Liberty continue to fall as America goes through an identity crisis, the Bible provides hope for the hopeless. In a letter to the church at Galatia, the apostle Paul reminds individuals of this region that Jesus came to liberate sinners. Instead of being held captive by addiction, God wants everyone to experience spiritual freedom. Yet, bad habits have a way of ensnaring souls, similar to a yoke of slavery. Whenever you allow your sinful nature to get out of hand, reigning in your flesh can take months or years to regain control. Thus, if you are looking for a glimmer of hope, love is the answer. Paul references the golden rule, “loving your neighbor as yourself.” This reminder can be traced back to the Sermon on the Mount as Jesus reveals love is conditional. If you don’t forgive others, God won’t forgive you, Matthew 6:14-15. May your own acts of love inspired by the Holy Spirit turn Lady Liberty’s frown into a smile.

by Jay Mankus

The Bible and the Declaration of Independence

A rare copy of the Declaration of Independence was recently discovered at the West Sussex Records Office in Chicester, United Kingdom.  The unique aspect of this copy is that the names of the founders are randomly placed on the back.  In the original, the names of the founders are aligned by the state each represented.  Researcher Emily Sneff and Harvard Professor Danielle Allen spent 2 years tracking down this piece of history.  Based upon the differences, new theories have been introduced with some questioning history as we know it.

See to it, brothers and sisters, that none of you has a sinful, unbelieving heart that turns away from the living God, Hebrews 3:12.

The unearthing of the Dead Sea Scrolls has had a similar impact on the Bible.  Since 1946 archaeologists have collected 981 manuscripts which support the authenticity of the Old Testament.  Despite these historical treasures, there is a movement to treat the Bible and Constitution as a living document.  While authors of the Bible refer to this book as living and active, this means the message within God’s Word can penetrate soul and spirit to touch the human heart.  On the other hand, those who view the Bible as a living document refers to changing with the times making biblical principles obselete.

For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart, Hebrews 4:12.

Although many people put on a good front, pain exists deep inside individuals searching for answers to life.  Over time you will come across those who think they have all the answers.  These so called experts may even introduce new ideas to combat moderns issues.  Yet, in the end, the Bible and Constitution have withstood the test of time.  The prophet Isaiah came to a similar conclusion thousands of years ago, “the grass withers, the flowers fade, but the word of God stands forever.”  May these two documents serve as a guiding light as you try to make it through the ups and downs in life.

by Jay Mankus

 

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