RSS Feed

Tag Archives: overcoming lust

What’s in a Thought?

According to a 2011 article by Elizabeth Dougherty, the human brain is composed of nearly 100 billion nerve cells. These neurons are interconnected by trillions of synapses. Each connection transmits about one signal per second with specialized connections sending up to 1,000 signals per second. Based upon the research done by Charles Jennings, the director of neurotechnology at the MIT McGovern Institute for Brain Research, these signals produce thoughts.

For the weapons of our warfare are not physical [weapons of flesh and blood], but they are mighty before God for the overthrow and destruction of strongholds, 2 Corinthians 10:4.

In a letter written to the church of Corinth, the apostle Paul takes a spiritual approach to thoughts. Beside receiving insight on this topic from the Holy Spirit, Paul became close friends with a first century doctor. According to the book of Acts, a well known physician named Luke traveled with Paul on a number of his missionary journeys. While Luke served mainly as a historian, the passage below suggests discussions with his friend on how thoughts can control and influence human behavior.

[Inasmuch as we] refute arguments and theories and reasonings and every proud and lofty thing that sets itself up against the [true] knowledge of God; and we lead every thought and purpose away captive into the obedience of Christ (the Messiah, the Anointed One), 2 Corinthians 10:5.

Based upon the research uncovered by MIT, taking your thoughts captive is a lot more complicated than I previously understood. If a thought are signals in your mind and thinking is a way to obtain knowledge, divine intervention is essential to prevent evil from corrupting your mind. The mistake Adam and Eve made in the Garden of Eden was taking a second glance at the forbidden fruit hanging from the Tree of Knowledge. Since wandering minds are easily distracted, unless you set your mind on things above, Colossians 3:1-4, it won’t be long before lust overwhelms your soul.

by Jay Mankus

Hungry Eyes

The inspiration behind Eric Carmen’s song Hungry Eyes was simple, getting a new recording contract. Since Hungry Eyes was a song on Carmen’s demo reel, this song was first released in 1987 with little expectation for success. Meanwhile, Millennium Records, the soundtrack for Dirty Dancing, was looking for one more song to complete its project. Thirty two million copies later, Hungry Eyes lives on today as a classic song which reached as high as #4 on the Billboard Top 100 Chart.

The eye is the lamp of the body. So if your eye is sound, your entire body will be full of light. 23 But if your eye is unsound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the very light in you [your conscience] is darkened, how dense is that darkness, Matthew 6:22-23.

Despite the success of this song, Jesus warns a first century crowd about the dangers of developing hungry eyes. Jesus uses the analogy of light and darkness to illustrate how human eyes serve as the lamp of your body. Those who focus their attention on the good, light, will be blessed. Unfortunately, anyone who allows lust to corrupt their eyes, opens the door, welcoming evil each time people indulge their sinful nature.

Do not love or cherish the world or the things that are in the world. If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in him. 16 For all that is in the world—the lust of the flesh [craving for sensual gratification] and the lust of the eyes [greedy longings of the mind] and the pride of life [assurance in one’s own resources or in the stability of earthly things]—these do not come from the Father but are from the world [itself], 1 John 2:15-16.

According to one of Jesus’ disciples, hungry eyes are a byproduct of love for the world. As individuals taste forbidden fruit by crossing the boundaries set in the Bible, a craving for sensual gratification is conceived. When bad habits such as masturbation, pornographic and sexual immorality linger without purging these sinful tendencies from your life, hungry eyes take over, fueled by a lust for more. If today’s blog finds you in bondage, held captive by sin, ask the Lord for an escape route, 1 Corinthians 10:13, to overcome the spiritual condition known as hungry eyes.

by Jay Mankus

When Evil Overshadows Goodness

Evil is defined as profoundly immoral and wicked. Synonyms include bad, corrupt, depraved, foul, sinful, ungodly and wrong. When America was founded, Christians left Great Britain to start a new country with an emphasis on freedom of religion. Pilgrims and Puritans got on ships to set sail to this new land. To ensure that not just the elite and wealthy received education, schools were founded by churches to teach common people the Bible. Up until the early 1960’s, public schools used intercoms to read the Bible verse of the day into homerooms. This practice was designed to promote goodness over evil.

Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter! – Isaiah 5:20

If you study history, civilizations go through cycles that often repeat itself when mistakes of the past aren’t corrected or learned from. According to one Old Testament prophet, Israel had turned away from God. During this period of darkness, some Jews began to confuse evil with good. Unfortunately, this pattern is nothing new. If you use nightly news as an example, how does each broadcast begin? Usually with breaking news of an accident, crash, disaster, tragedy or violence. At some point, this ambulance chasing mentality has placed ratings as a higher priority than truth, justice and the American way. Subsequently, evil overshadows stories of goodness on a nightly basis.

The eye is the lamp of the body. So if your eye is sound, your entire body will be full of light. But if your eye is unsound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the very light in you [your conscience] is darkened, how dense is that darkness! – Matthew 6:22-23

Jesus addresses this topic during his sermon on the mount. According to the passage above, eyes are the lamp of human bodies. If your eyes use sound judgement, your entire body will be full of light and goodness. However, if anyone falls prey to lust, 1 John 2:15-17, individuals open the door for evil to enter your life. When enticement results in unsound practices, Jesus points out that consciences are darkened. This is how evil overshadows goodness. When evil is allowed to reside within human hearts, justification and rationalization follow. May this blog serve as a warning to regain control of wandering eyes. The sooner confession elicits a contrite heart, goodness can prevail as long as evil is disposed of and purged from your life.

by Jay Mankus

The Degrading Power of Sin

The Bible is littered with depressing, shocking and troubling accounts of people who have fallen from grace.  Jealousy led Cain to kill his brother Abel after God was not pleased with his offering.  Abraham lied to a king, claiming that his wife was his sister, afraid that he might get killed.  Love caused Samson to marry and sleep with an enemy of Israel.  Lust drove David to commit adultery and murder to be with the woman of his dreams.  These are just a few examples of the degrading power of sin.

Therefore God gave them over in the lusts of their own hearts to [sexual] impurity, so that their bodies would be dishonored among them [abandoning them to the degrading power of sin], Romans 1:24.

Those who fall prey and become ensnared by sin do so due to a spiritual problem.  The apostle Paul wrote a letter to the church of Corinth encouraging members to take their thoughts captive.  When minds begin to wonder, temporary pleasures supersede desires to retain the knowledge of God.  While not everyone gives into temptation, sin has a seductive power like an addiction that won’t leave you alone.

For I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my flesh [my human nature, my worldliness—my sinful capacity]. For the willingness [to do good] is present in me, but the doing of good is not. 19 For the good that I want to do, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want. 20 But if I am doing the very thing I do not want to do, I am no longer the one doing it [that is, it is not me that acts], but the sin [nature] which lives in me, Romans 7:18-20.

Within a chapter to Christians in Rome, the apostle Paul confesses sins power over his own life.  Paul details failures, struggles and the crippling power of sin reigning within his life.  Like a caged wild animal, the sinful nature within human beings is too strong to control on your own.  When sin leads souls on the door steps of temptation, only one name can help you escape from behind the devil’s door.  Call out to Jesus and you will be saved, Romans 10:9-11, on the path toward restoration.

by Jay Mankus

A Fool’s Eyes

One of my favorite quotes from Forrest Gump starring Tom Hanks is “stupid is as stupid does.”  Sometimes its easier to recognize stupidity rather than go into specific details.  A common synonym for stupid is foolish.  This label is earned when an ill-advised act, choice or word is made.

A discerning person keeps wisdom in view, but a fool’s eyes wander to the ends of the earth, Proverbs 17:24.

According to King Solomon, fools tend to get distracted.  Instead of thinking before you act, the world provides ample temptations to lose your way.  While the discerning keep wisdom in sight, fools wander off the straight and narrow.  The longer an individual indulges in the pleasures in life, the hardest it becomes to leave this wayward road.

For everything in the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life—comes not from the Father but from the world, 1 John 2:16.

People don’t wake up and decide I’m going to do something foolish.  Rather, a series of compromises places souls on a path toward destruction.  The naive believe they will be able to turn back whenever they want.  Unfortunately, the fool’s eyes often wait until they are on verge on death before coming to their senses.  May those struggling at this moment heed the verses in scriptures above to escape a fool’s eyes before its too late.

by Jay Mankus

 

%d bloggers like this: