RSS Feed

Tag Archives: humbling

When a Communion Ceremony Turned into a Pissing Match

The content of your conversation reflects the type of person that you are. Everyone has a hot button, a topic that you can talk about for hours at a time. Depending upon who you are talking with, you may be tempted to one up whoever is speaking. Following the conclusion of their story, you may brag, embellish or exaggerate to impress everyone in the room. This is exactly what happened when Jesus’ disciples turned the first communion ceremony into a pissing match of who’s the best.

Then He took a loaf [of bread], and when He had given thanks, He broke [it] and gave it to them saying, This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me. 20 And in like manner, He took the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament or covenant [ratified] in My blood, which is shed (poured out) for you. 21 But, behold, the hand of him who [a]is now engaged in betraying Me is with Me on the table. 22 For the Son of Man is going as it has been determined and appointed, but woe to that man by whom He is betrayed and delivered up! 23 And they began to inquire among themselves which of them it was who was about to do this, Luke 22:19-23.

Insecurities tend to cause human beings to want to be liked by their peers. Subsequently, you may lie or pretend to be what is popular, trendy or socially acceptable. This masquerade continues until you’re fully comfortable with the person that you’ve become or you no longer care about what other people think. In the case of the twelve disciples, each one was trying to impress Jesus, hoping to become his favorite. This insecurity spawned a look how much better I am than you debate.

But Jesus said to them, The kings of the Gentiles [c]are deified by them and exercise lordship [[d]ruling as emperor-gods] over them; and those in authority over them are called benefactors and well-doers. 26 But this is not to be so with you; on the contrary, let him who is the greatest among you become like the youngest, and him who is the chief and leader like one who serves. 27 For who is the greater, the one who reclines at table (the master), or the one who serves? Is it not the one who reclines at table? But I am in your midst as One Who serves, Luke 22:25-27.

This earthly mindset is exposed in the passage above. Heaven isn’t concerned about who the best is at this or that. Rather, heaven rejoices at the sight of Christians humbling themselves so that they develop a heart to serve others. Jesus didn’t just talk a good game; He was willing to lay down his life for sinners, Romans 5:8. Therefore, the next time someone tries to get you to participate in a I’m a better Christian than you debate, steer this conversation toward becoming the greatest servant of all.

by Jay Mankus

Nobody is Listening

Every once in a while people are blinded by pride.  This overconfidence within the minds of individuals results in losing touch with reality.  Subsequently, as someone wanders off on a tangent, the audience initially listening quickly tunes out.

Making your ear attentive to wisdom and inclining your heart to understanding; Proverbs 2:2.

There is nothing worse as a teacher than to be so consumed with what you are saying that you fail to recognize no one is listening.  Despite what you thought to be a flawless lesson plan has turned into a snoozer as blank stares and sleeping students force you to figure out what went wrong.  Although it may be humbling, sometimes you have to be open to an honest assessment from students.  While some comments may be inspired from impure motives, you will find blunt answers that reveal why nobody is listening.

He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who conquers I will grant to eat of the tree of life, which is in the paradise of God,’ Revelation 2:7.

After sharing a parable, Jesus often used the saying, “let him who has ears hear.”  This spoke to the stubbornness within human hearts.  If you think you are right, then you become oblivious to those who possess an opposing point of view.  Many who heard the powerful illustrations of Jesus often left turning a deaf ear, continuing on the current path they were on.  Therefore, if you want to know the truth why nobody is listening, you have to be open to change as the Holy Spirit reveals the next step, Galatians 5:25, to take in life.

by Jay Mankus

 

No Barriers

I was having one of those humbling/trying weeks where nothing seemed to go right.  As I was about to have a pity party for myself, I stumbled upon an article on the top 25 most adventurous men of the last 25 years.  Number 23 on this list was Erik Weihenmayer for kayaking through the Grand Canyon.  This feat may seem relatively obscure unless of course you consider the fact that Eric is blind.

Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed,” John 20:29.

This incredible journey is detailed in the book No Barriers.  While I have had my own eye issues over the past 20 years, I am still able to see the beauty of God’s creation.  As someone who has canoed and kayaked down river rapids, past guides trained me to look for the V.  This is the safest place to enter rapids.  However, down one sense, Erik Weihenmayer has to rely solely on his hearing.  This is where ability and faith meet, trusting in God to get you down stream safely.

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen, Hebrews 11:1.

It’s only fitting that I discovered No Barriers while waiting to see my eye doctor.  Despite my fears of glaucoma, I experienced a divine appointment with the Lord this afternoon.  Instead of feeling sorry for myself, this article was like a kick in the butt to persevere.  If Erik Weihenmayer can kayak blind through class four rapids on the Colorado River, then the Lord can still use my decaying body to bear spiritual fruit.  The only barriers that exist are seeds of doubt which cause many individuals to give up before obtaining your dreams in life.

by Jay Mankus

%d bloggers like this: