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S.A.N.S. Episode 65: Another Alternative

Today’s feature song comes from the former lead singer of Sonic Flood. I met Jeff Deyo while I was a youth pastor in Columbus, Indiana which is Jeff’s hometown. Jeff’s story is similar to what happened to Tom Petty. The film Straight Outta Compton illustrates the fact that agents, producers and record labels use new artists to make themselves wealthy. Meanwhile, talented musicians like Jeff Deyo and Tom Petty barely make anything despite releasing top selling albums.

The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance (to the full, till it [b]overflows), John 10:10.

Jeff left Sonic Flood to partner with his wife to make a living as a musician. While I haven’t spoken with Jeff for more than two decades, it’s sad how many talented musicians aren’t able to make a career out of doing what they love. Deyo’s album Another Alternative and song with the same name combines dance, hip hop and rap. As the world continues to evolve, the Bible provides instructions of how to live an alternative life fueled by faith. May today’s song and this album touch your heart and stir your soul.

by Jay Mankus

A Not So Trademark Move

During a Major League Baseball game, players get to select the song played each time that they walk from the on desk circle to home plate.  This blurb is usually the chorus or the most popular part of the song, playing for five to ten seconds.  While you won’t see this on television, a similar process occurs when relievers enter the game.  In the classic 1989 film, Major League, Charlie Sheen played Ricky Vaughn, a hard throwing closer.  Upon entering the game in relief from the outfield bullpen, the song Wild Thing blared until Ricky made it to the mound.  Music has a way of inspiring trademark moves.

So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is sin, James 4:17.

A trademark refers to a brand, logo or sign that is legally registered as a symbol that represents a company or product.  In the entertainment business, music and videos featuring an artists’ new song features choreography.  This dance, move or step often becomes a known as a trademark move.  For Michael Jackson, it was the moon walk.  The pioneers of hip hop and rap developed break dancing, becoming a cultural phenomena.  Marcia Griffiths and Bunny Wailer’s 1976 song “Electric Boogie,” inspired what is known today of the Electric Slide, a memorable dance at any party or wedding.

For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord, Romans 6:23.

The group Reliant K gives a different interpretation of trademark moves.  The lyrics of their song entitled Trademark focuses on human nature.  While everyone wants to paint a rosy picture on life, Reliant K sings about falling apart and running away from God.  The prophet Jonah once took a boat in the opposite direction of where God called them to go, ending up in the belly of a whale due to disobedience, this was his trademark move.  The apostle Paul reminds all human beings that no one is innocent, but all are guilty of sin.  This painful reality was the trademark move of Adam and Eve, hiding from God in the Garden of Eden.  Anyone who follows in these footsteps, emulates a not so trademark move.  In view of this fallen state, make sure the legacy you leave behind results in positive impressions.

by Jay Mankus

 

 

 

 

The Elusive Search for Authority

Cowboys and Indians are symbols of western exploration in America.  In 1997, Paula Cole asks the question in her song, “Where have all the Cowboys gone?”  Although the sing refers to a woman looking for a story book ending, to live happily ever after, cowboys are symbolic of hard work, self-reliance and in a sense, law and order maintained by sheriffs who rode on horse back.  Like the famous quote from Curly in the 1991 film City Slickers, “cowboys are a dying breed.”

Calling the Twelve to him, he began to send them out two by two and gave them authority over impure spirits, Mark 6:7.

The same can be said about authority today.  Between the hip hop and rap culture disrespecting police officers with their lyrics, political correctness redefining ethics and the assault on the authenticity of the Bible, authority is disappearing.  By smearing individuals with integrity as well as failing to hold others accountable to high standards, the ability to confront, rebuke and correct flawed worldviews is diminishing.  All that remains is a blue print laid out by Jesus to his disciples.

Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons. Freely you have received; freely give, Matthew 10:8.

Jesus sent out 12 ordinary men with one extraordinary message, “repent for the kingdom of heaven is near.”  Jesus wasn’t trying to be like an overbearing coach, parent or teacher trying to tell you everything that you are doing wrong.  Rather, Jesus wanted human beings to reflect upon their lives and allow the Holy Spirit to convict souls.  When sins are expressed in a public settings, others feel compelled to come clean.  This atmospheres lays a foundation for revival.  When the words of the Bible are used properly, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, God’s authority can be restored to on earth as it is in heaven.

by Jay Mankus

 

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