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Tag Archives: addicted

Getting Too Close to the Fire

There is something intriguing about fire.  Perhaps, this may explain why boys are drawn to experiment and play with fire.  In January of 1983, English Rock Band Def Leppard introduced their latest album entitled Pyromania.  Over 10 million copies were sold in the United States suggesting either this sound or a fascination with fire contributed to its success.

Can a man scoop fire into his lap without his clothes being burned?  Can a man walk on hot coals without his feet being scorched? – Proverbs 6:27-28

As an adult, the concept of fire still applies, but usually in a different context.  The Bible uses fire as an analogy, comparing it with temptation.  Drawn in by the flames, Solomon suggests that if you get too close to the fire, you will eventually get burned.  Unfortunately, the scars will not appear on your skin like burn victims.  Rather, the soul can be scorched, resulting in soul ties and eventually soul spirit hurts if you engage and indulge in temptation.

If we deliberately keep on sinning after we have received the knowledge of the truth, no sacrifice for sins is left, but only a fearful expectation of judgment and of raging fire that will consume the enemies of God, Hebrews 10:26-27.

The author of Hebrews addresses those who become addicted to playing with fire.  Whenever you find yourself in a downward spiral, committing the same sin over and over again, God’s grace is being cheapened daily.  Essentially, individuals are crucifying Jesus over and over again with each sin.  Therefore, intervention is often necessary to drag someone out of addictive habits.  If this blog finds you a pyro or under the influence of some other sin, practice the words of James 5:16 so that you will be healed before its too late.

by Jay Mankus

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A Sinner’s Life

Since paradise was lost in the Garden of Eden, no one can escape the temptation to sin.  While some make better choices than others, a sinner’s life is like attending the school of hard knocks.  Living and learning from past mistakes has a learning curve with many struggling to avoid Satan’s snares.

All have turned away, they have together become worthless; there is no one who does good, not even one, Romans 3:12.

If you have the opportunity to travel the country or across the world, you begin to get a sense for what’s out there.  Along the way, you will rub shoulders with various groups of people, witnessing the good, the bad and the ugly.  During his missionary journey’s throughout the Middle East, the apostle Paul makes an interesting observation.  Similar to economic classes, Paul writes about the classification of sinners, separating typical offenders from those addicted.

The sins of some are obvious, reaching the place of judgment ahead of them; the sins of others trail behind them, 1 Timothy 5:24.

If actions speak louder than words, sins communicate the heart and the soul of individuals.  Although some may dabble in sin from time to time, others follow in the footsteps of the prodigal, continuing until they reach rock bottom.  When the sensations of temporary pleasures fade, sinners face an important decision, do I come to my senses or not?  How a sinner’s life ends is in your hands.  Therefore, may you heed the words of 1 John 1:6 so that darkness does not prematurely end your life and the reason why you were created.

by Jay Mankus

 

The Proclamation to Imprisoned Spirits

A modern use for the term proclamation is a broadcast, manifesto or public notice.  Depending upon the messenger of a proclamation, commercials, infomercials or public service announcements may be used to get the word out to the masses.  However, for those without televisions or access to the internet, its vital for someone to go door to door if a message is life changing.

After being made alive, Jesus went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits, 1 Peter 3:19.

Following Jesus’ resurrection, one of his disciples recounts an important mission not mentioned by other writers of the Bible.  While no specific names are mentioned, Jesus visits individuals who were held captive by imprisoned souls.  Although the gospels recall 500 eyewitnesses who encountered Jesus after resurrection Sunday and before his ascension, its unclear whether Jesus visits men or women.  Thus, I’m assuming Jesus spent time with those addicted to certain types of sin.

For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost, Luke 19:10.

The purpose of these house calls is made known by an earthly doctor unable to heal certain individuals.  Thus, Jesus provided a spiritual cure to save imprisoned souls.  With the scars stills visible in Jesus hands and feet, those doubting God’s power were likely shown and proclaimed, “by these wounds, you have been healed.”  This is the proclamation to imprisoned spirit, still available for you and me today.

by Jay Mankus

Clinging to the Security Blankets of Your Past

Charles Schultz conjured up in his mind a fictional character with real life tendencies in his classic comic strip Peanuts.  Linus was a boy who never wanted to leave his favorite blanket, finding comfort from this childhood possession.  Today, infants have similar habits, becoming attached to binkies, serving as a calming device to produce sleep.  Despite purging closets each spring, most adults aren’t willing to let go of sentimental items, keeping a few like a security blanket from your past.

Peter was a professional fisherman whose new acquaintance introduced himself as a carpenter.  Luke 5:1-11 recounts this first meeting as Peter listens to Jesus speak after a long night of work.   Despite his initial hesitation, Peter is willing to trust someone from another occupation, based upon a gut feeling within his heart, Luke 5:6.  Subsequently, Peter reached a point of conviction, guilty of holding on to traditions instead of faith.  By the end of this passage, each member of his crew was touched by God, leaving everything they knew behind, letting go of their security blankets.

I’m not sure if its my ego, pride or stubbornness, but I find it hard to completely change the routines I have set in life.  Sure, every New Year’s provides a tempest, the perfect conditions to rededicate one’s life.  Nonetheless, the fear of uncertainty prevents permanent transformation from occurring.  Thus, when the going get’s tough, people fall back on what they know instead of following the advice of strangers.  This reality of life fulfills the words of Proverbs 27:19, “as water reflects a face, so a man’s heart reflects the man.”  May the example of these fishermen inspire others to forgo the security blankets of their past with a faith for the future.

by Jay Mankus

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