RSS Feed

Tag Archives: the storms of life

The Shadow of Things to Come

Foreshadowing is a literary term that serves as an indication, a warning of future events. Shakespeare mastered the art of foreshadowing, sprinkling this technique within several of his literary pieces. From a biblical point of view, the Old Testament is full of foreshadowing as hints of a Messiah started dropping following Original Sin, Genesis 3:15. Prophets of old placed imagery into the Bible to prepare first century Jews for Jesus’ arrival.

Such [things] are only the shadow of things that are to come, and they have only a symbolic value. But the reality (the substance, the solid fact of what is foreshadowed, the body of it) belongs to Christ, Colossians 2:17.

In a letter to the Church at Corinth, the apostle Paul refers to the shadow of things to come. This passage serves as a way to unwrap the science of God. Theology unveils the connection between Jesus and God the Father. Colossians 2:13-15 illustrates how Jesus was able to conquer death and cancel the written code set up in the Old Testament. The foreshadowing here is likely the future church, belonging to and united by Jesus.

Let no one defraud you by acting as an umpire and declaring you unworthy and disqualifying you for the prize, insisting on self-abasement and worship of angels, taking his stand on visions [he claims] he has seen, vainly puffed up by his sensuous notions and inflated by his unspiritual thoughts and fleshly conceit, Colossians 2:18.

Unfortunately, premature judgements, labeling and stereotypes have corrupted modern day churches. As leaders act as umpires instead of spiritual mentors, the gospel message has been watered down. When preachers end up becoming hypocrites, void of any spiritually fruit, souls are left with a bad taste. If Christians aren’t prepared for the storms of life, the shadow of things to come will bring ruin rather than rest. May this blog serve as a warning to prepare yourself for future rough patches, James 1:3-6, like a shadow of things to come.

by Jay Mankus

An Anchor for the Soul

Prior to the Bronze Age, ships typically relied on rocks as an anchor.  The ancient Greeks placed several placed rocks, bags of sand or wooden logs filled with lead into a basket.  Leading up to the 19th century, the manufacturing process of anchors was imperfect.  The curve feature of modern anchors did not appear until 1813 when Pering, a clerk from Plymouth Yard introduced this feature.  Time has perfected this vital piece of equipment, saving the lives of countless crewmen from running aground during the storms of life.

We have this hope as an anchor for the soul, firm and secure. It enters the inner sanctuary behind the curtain, Hebrews 6:19.

According to the author of Hebrews, hope is a spiritual anchor for the soul.  Without signs of hope, the human spirit can wilt, pushed to a breaking point.  If you ever feel like giving up, the Bible provides a valuable solution.  When an individual throws an anchor overboard, the bottom is invisible, relying on the tension of the chain to determine if you’ve struck the bottom.  In the same way, God’s unchanging nature is rock solid, fulfilling the promises He has made in the past.  This is the anchor for troubled souls.

Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up, Galatians 6:9.

Every day on earth is like taking a journey out to sea.  You never know what you will find, who or what you will encounter and how quickly the weather will change.  When the unexpected arises, who will you trust?  Some have gotten into the habit of relying in their own abilities.  Although God has given everyone certain qualities, leaning on the Lord will help you ride out troubled waters.  Whatever life throws at you, don’t forget about the anchor for the soul.

by Jay Mankus

%d bloggers like this: