RSS Feed

Tag Archives: overcoming cancer

Overcoming the Coronavirus Mountain

If you listen to cable news, scan social media or regularly follow Twitter, fear is spread daily about the Coronavirus. When the CDC updates their numbers of new cases and death toll every afternoon, panic can set in at anytime. Trying to fight this invisible disease can overwhelm even optimistic souls. Thus, the more contagious and deadly the Coronavirus becomes. it’s like trying to climb the Mt. Everest in Himalayan Mountains by yourself, without any assistance.

And Peter remembered and said to Him, Master, look! The fig tree which You doomed has withered away! 22 And Jesus, replying, said to them, Have faith in God [constantly], Mark 11:21-22.

Beside being called a Jewish Rabbi, Jesus was an amazing teacher, using visual aids to illustrate spiritual truths. Earlier in the day, Jesus was hoping to rely on a fig tree to satisfy his hunger. Upon further review, this tree was barren. Seizing the moment, Jesus cursed this tree which withered immediately. This act wasn’t done for selfish ambition. Rather, Jesus wanted to demonstrate the power of prayer. To show the spiritual potential for those who believe in God.

23 Truly I tell you, whoever says to this mountain, Be lifted up and thrown into the sea! and does not doubt at all in his heart but believes that what he says will take place, it will be done for him. 24 For this reason I am telling you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe (trust and be confident) that it is granted to you, and you will [get it], Mark 1:23-24.

In his book Relentless, John Tess shares his battle with cancer. Given 18 months to live with a rare form of prostrate cancer, this disease was relentless, coming back time after time. Three years into his struggle to survive, one verse from the Bible transformed John’s perspective. Mark 1:23 uses a mountain to convey that obstacles face individuals daily. The only way to conquer and overcome these barriers is through prayer. May God give you the faith to believe that fasting and prayer will result in developing a cure for Coronavirus.

by Jay Mankus

Overcoming the Loss of a Loved One

My son Daniel and I were in the middle of deep frying chicken wings and homemade french fries when news of Kobe Bryant’s death first broke. In the days that have passed since January 26th, cable news, sports talk shows and Twitter have shared reflections on the life of Kobe Bryant. Yet, what about all the others? The homeless, outcasts and poor who die daily rarely make their local newspaper. Thus, Kobe Bryant’s tragic death has brought attention to overcoming the loss of a loved one.

He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds, Psalm 147:3.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC, there were 2,813,503 registered deaths in 2017 in America. This comes out to 7708 deaths per day or 321 per hour. While some of these deaths may include an entire family, friends and neighbors need to learn how to get by without them. The first step to recovery is dealing with the 5 stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Unfortunately, I have a friend who lost his son to cancer a decade ago and still hasn’t come to grips with this loss. Like many throughout history, the death of a loved one can send you into a tailspin that you never fully recover from.

“Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted,” Matthew 5:4.

One of my good friends from high school died during my sophomore year of college, losing her two year battle with cancer. I took Maureen’s death hard, struggling to come with grips with why. As the years have passed since her death, the Lord has provided a few answers to my prayers. Although I wasted my opportunities to share my faith with Maureen, her death has inspired me to make sure I don’t repeat this mistake. Maureen’s death in 1989 conceived in me a desire for evangelism which has led to the creation of Express Yourself 4Him. While everyone grieves differently, may this blog help you better cope with overcoming the loss of a loved one.

by Jay Mankus

%d bloggers like this: