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Tag Archives: fighting through adversity

Over Playing the Victim Card

Over the past year, cable news networks have reported about the transformation occurring on college and university campuses throughout the United States.  Some of these exclusives have addressed the transition from education and knowledge based curriculum toward political and social activism.  One college professor recently gave students the option to either take a final exam or participate in a group project.  The class chose to protest Trump at a nearby rally.

“As surely as God lives, who has denied me justice, the Almighty, who has made my life bitter,” Job 27:2.

One of the angles disgruntled voters are taking is victimology.  Instead of fighting through adversity, battling disappointment and overcoming failures, the victim card is being played over and over again.  Sure, many individuals are dealt an unfair hand in life.  This is a painful reality in this life.  Yet, God is not pleased when his own followers join the crowd of the disenfranchised.  Seeking pity from the privileged isn’t the right course of action.  Rather, the Lord has a better choice for those unable to grasp why bad things happen to good people.

Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear, Ephesians 4:29.

When his friends began to hint that recent trials were self-inflicted, part of some secret sin, Job began to play the victim card.  Within Job 27, this man of integrity begins to blame God for his problems.  This was Job’s fatal flaw, an inappropriate response to his hardship.  The apostle Paul introduces a more appropriate course of action.  Despite how you really feel inside, negative comments, harsh criticism and demoralizing words doesn’t solve your situation.  Rather, ask the Lord for rays of hope, signs of progress and a spirit of optimism.  In doing this, you will turn your victim card in for a peace that surpasses understanding.

by Jay Mankus

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Blinded for a Time

In the 1988 action film Bloodsport, Jean-Claude Van Damme plays a martial arts expert Frank Dux.  The name is derived from a famous competition known as the Kumite.  During the championship match, the defending champion who killed on of his opponents in a preliminary match, throws a foreign substance into Dux’s eyes.  Blinded for a short time, Frank panics before relying on his training which carries him onto victory.

Saul got up from the ground, but when he opened his eyes he could see nothing. So they led him by the hand into Damascus, Acts 9:8.

The saying “you don’t know what you have until its gone” can be applied to several aspects in life.  A soldier who relies on his strength may loose a limb or limbs in battle.  Individuals may take forgranted a special relationship until death takes this person away prematurely.  Meanwhile, a career or home can be ruined in a blink of an eye.  Regardless of who you are or where you live, sooner or later you will be blindsided by a trial.  How you respond will determine the path you take in life.

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials, 1 Peter 1:6.

Looking back over the last 5 years of my life, I was forced to fight through adversity.  Through some of the ups and downs, there were times I felt God turned his back on me.  Yet, as I was blinded for a time, I learned that God never moved.  Rather, I allowed bitterness, frustration and regret lead me to drift away into period of depression.  However, like Jean-Claude Van Damme in the end of Bloodsport, my previous training in the Bible is helping me return to a victorious life in Christ.

by Jay Mankus

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