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Tag Archives: ethos

Stop Talking and Start Leading

The politicalization of current events has made most cable news networks nearly impossible to watch for more than one segment.  Instead of answering questions presented by a host, guests regularly dodge, evade and redirect conversation to add the latest political talking point.  Meanwhile, as candidates compete for their parties presidential nomination, debating the issues has been replaced by name calling, personal attacks and smearing an opponents’ character.  Perhaps, its time for all politicians to stop talking and start leading.

Know this, my beloved brothers: let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger; for the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God, James 1:19-20.

Growing up in the shadow of his older brother, James couldn’t compete with Jesus.  While its not mentioned in the Bible, I’m sure Mary challenged her younger son to be more like Jesus.  Subsequently, a sibling rivalry began which blinded James from seeing that his brother was the promised Messiah of the Old Testament.  Following Jesus’ resurrection, a convicted heart led James to write “be quick to hear and slow to speak.”  A modern translation is simply shut up and listen.

Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity, 1 Timothy 4:12.

The Greek language uses three terms which serve as modes of persuasion to convince an audience to follow what you believe.  Ethos is the ethical means by which your actions make you a credible person who can be trusted.  Pathos is a quality of an experience in life like a testimony which creates an emotional connection with an audience.  Finally, logos relies on facts, logic and statistics to persuade individuals to come to your point of view.  My advice to anyone seeking to pursue a political office, stop talking and start leading.

by Jay Mankus

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You Don’t Say…

Say You Will was one of Foreigner’s last songs to crack the Top 10 in the United States. Lou Gramm and Mick Jones co-wrote “Say You Will” for this classic British American rock band. Released as a single on December 5th, 1987, the lyrics refer to a relationship on the fritz. Similar to an on again, off again agreement, the band sings about wanting their girl to be mine tonight.

If a brother or sister is without [adequate] clothing and lacks [enough] food for each day, 16 and one of you says to them, “Go in peace [with my blessing], [keep] warm and feed yourselves,” but he does not give them the necessities for the body, what good does that do? – James 2:15-16

Sometimes you have to leave the English language to find a word that gives a more accurate description of what you are trying to say. In the context of living out what you say, the best term I have found comes from Greek. Ethos refers to the moral element that determines a character’s action. In other words, you don’t have to say this or that. Rather, over time your actions demonstrate a genuine and perceived care and concern for others.

But prove yourselves doers of the word [actively and continually obeying God’s precepts], and not merely listeners [who hear the word but fail to internalize its meaning], deluding yourselves [by unsound reasoning contrary to the truth], James 1:22.

Before finishing analogies, parables and sermons, Jesus often urged crowds to be doers. Anyone can listen, but it takes discipline, effort and focus to put Jesus’ words into action. In the parable of the two sons, one promises to do a task but doesn’t. The other son initially rejects this request but ends up doing it anyway. The point of today’s blog is don’t say you will, just do it!

by Jay Mankus

Character Education

As societies evolve, the meaning of words change to reflect this evolution.  In the early stages of American history, character referred to personality, nature and qualities.  One of the synonyms for character is ethos, where we derive the Greek term ethics.  Ethics is the system of philosophy where individuals develop their basis for defining right and wrong.  Today, character education focuses on an initiative to foster global citizenship.

Whoever walks in integrity walks securely, but he who makes his ways crooked will be found out, Proverbs 10:9.

Based upon the United Nations global education initiative, character education is based upon three core philosophies: humanism, socialism and utilitarianism.  Utilitarianism teaches actions are right if they are useful or for the benefit of a majority.  Socialism advocates that the means of production, distribution, and exchange should be owned or regulated by the community as a whole.  Finally, humanism denies the presence of a Creator, seeking solely rational ways of solving human problems.  Signed by former president Obama, this curriculum is now being implemented into public education within K-12 schools across the country.

Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect, Romans 12:2.

When I first heard of Character Education on the Rush Limbaugh Show, I thought this sounds good, a step in the right direction.  Yet, as I began to hear and read more about this as a former teacher, I was horrified.  This attempt to erase the biblical influences within the foundation of America is unsettling.  Nonetheless, unless parents begin to challenge what their children are being taught, the true history of America will be forgotten.  May this blog awaken believers to stand up to this indoctrination by studying and teaching God’s divine intervention upon the founding fathers of this country.

by Jay Mankus

 

Where Did Ethos Go?

While I never finished completing seminary due to my iritis, the classes I completed have provided a plethora of knowledge.  One of my favorite terms is the Greek word ethos.  Philosophers like Aristotle used ethos in the context of a person’s character.  Yet, ethos means so much more, its the expression of love, allowing others to see that you genuinely care about their lives.  Those individuals who demonstrate ethos on a daily basis earn the right to be heard.

On hearing this, Jesus said, “It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick, Matthew 9:12.

Unfortunately, as I interact with people, listen to what others believe and watch how different worldviews treat one another, the concept of ethos is vanishing.  Narcissism, pride and stubborn hearts are leaving a trail of hate, attacking anyone who opposing their beliefs.  C.S. Lewis eludes to this oblivious trait as diabolical pride in Mere Christianity.  If this flaw continues, the concept of ethos may disappear.

But go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’ For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners,” Matthew 9:13.

There are certain areas, subjects or topics where people claim to be experts, knowing much more than most others.  Yet, it would help if individuals would learn to become humble and more teachable.  While you may think you know more than a boss, manager or teacher, showing respect breeds ethos.  If the phrase sharing is caring is employed, a generation will begin to witness the powerful effects of ethos on society.

by Jay Mankus

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