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The Prompting

The term prompting refers to the action of saying something to encourage, persuade, or remind someone to do or say something. Promptings may be inspired by advice, conviction, inducement, peer pressure or the urging of a loved one. If a prompting is not immediately acted upon, this reminder fades away until a new sense of urgency renews a willing desire to act.

When we were living in the flesh (mere physical lives), the sinful passions that were awakened and aroused up by [what] the Law [makes sin] were constantly operating in our natural powers (in our bodily organs, in the sensitive appetites and wills of the flesh), so that we bore fruit for death, Romans 7:5.

According to the apostle Paul, spiritual promptings are often ignored, distracted by greater physical promptings to drink, eat or sleep. Instead of operating in the supernatural, most human beings spend a majority of their earthly lives chasing worldly passions. Due to strong fleshly desires, sinful passions are awakened and aroused, prompted by sensitive appetites and wills of the flesh. This explains the internal tug of war described in Galatians 5:16-18.

But now we are discharged from the Law and have terminated all intercourse with it, having died to what once restrained and held us captive. So now we serve not under [obedience to] the old code of written regulations, but [under obedience to the promptings] of the Spirit in newness [of life], Romans 7:6.

The only way to follow the prompting of the Holy Spirit is by terminating all intercourse with the flesh. If you are confused by my analogy, I’m just quoting the passage above. The apostle Paul is simply suggesting that spiritual fruit is conceived by following the promptings of the Holy Spirit. Colossians 3:1-9 is a good reference point, a call to die to self by setting your heart and mind and things above, eternal treasures. While ignoring physical promptings is not easy, the Spirit is willing to overcome a weak body, Matthew 26:41.

by Jay Mankus

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