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Tag Archives: the Cancel Culture movement

Drawn in Diverging Directions

Diverging refers to following a different direction or path. Whenever you make a decision to diverge, you want to become different, going against the flow. In this Progressive Age, those who diverge should be celebrated for being interested in new ideas, findings and opportunities. Unfortunately, backlash from the Cancel Culture Movement is using political correctness, progressive ideology and social justice to shame individuals who deviate from the norm.

My desire is to have you free from all anxiety and distressing care. The unmarried man is anxious about the things of the Lord—how he may please the Lord; 33 But the married man is anxious about worldly matters—how he may please his wife—1 Corinthians 7:32-33

The apostle Paul introduces the concept of spiritual divergence in a letter to the church at Corinth. While trying to explain his perspective as a single man, Paul points to friends who were drawn in diverging directions. If you understand the concept of happy wife, happy life, spouses feel compelled to please their soul mates. Based upon Paul’s own encounters with married Christian brothers, devotion to God often slips as wives become a greater priority than the Lord.

And he is drawn in diverging directions [his interests are divided and he is distracted from his devotion to God]. And the unmarried woman or girl is concerned and anxious about the matters of the Lord, how to be wholly separated and set apart in body and spirit; but the married woman has her cares [centered] in earthly affairs—how she may please her husband, 1 Corinthians 7:34.

Whether you are single, married or recently divorced, everyone experiences cycles. Periods where you draw close to God and years when you drift apart. Days. weeks and months when you are disciplined and focused on seizing the moment only to fall back into bad habits, drawn back into diverging directions. This is where maintaining a healthy balance comes into play between work and recreation. As long as free will exists, people will continue to be drawn in diverging directions. As you diverge, make sure that you don’t stray too far from home.

by Jay Mankus

Erasing the Memory of Nancy Green

The latest victims to fall prey to the Cancel Culture Movement is Aunt Jemima, Mrs. Butterworth and Uncle Ben. It was only a matter of time for these politically incorrect brand news to be removed and replaced by a more appropriate progressive image. This soul-searching comes in the wake of the Pepsi Company’s announcement on Wednesday to rename it’s Aunt Jemima Syrup Brand. This decision ends a 130 relationship with Quaker Oats which began in 1889 with a black woman named Aunt Jemima who was originally dressed as a minstrel character.

Who by [the help of] faith subdued kingdoms, administered justice, obtained promised blessings, closed the mouths of lions, Hebrews 11:33.

While Quaker Oats is attempting to be socially responsible, there are actually erasing the memory of Nancy Green. Aunt Jemima was a real person based upon a woman born in Kentucky on November 17, 1834. Although born a slave, Nancy Green would eventually become a maid for a prominent family in the state of Illinois. Known for her special gifts as a cook and story teller, Nancy went on to become went on to become the first black corporate model in the United States. Aunt Jemima was Nancy Green. This opportunity opened the door for Nancy Green to earn her freedom, devoting the rest of her life to the church and fighting poverty.

Extinguished the power of raging fire, escaped the devourings of the sword, out of frailty and weakness won strength and became stalwart, even mighty and resistless in battle, routing alien hosts, Hebrews 11:34.

Now that Aunt Jemima’s face and name will be eliminated, the memories of Nancy Green will likely fade as time goes by. Just like the removal of historical statues in cities in across the United States, the roles of these influential leaders will disappear from history books. To avoid a similar fate, the Bible contains a Hall of Faith. The author of Hebrews devotes an entire chapter to men and women to ensure their acts of faith were not forgotten. Hebrews 11 serves as a history lesson of individuals in the Old Testament. Just like the legacy of faith left behind by Nancy Green, the Hall of Faith reminds readers of necessary attributes that you should strive to emulate.

by Jay Mankus

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