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Tag Archives: self-actualization

Let the Thief Steal No More

The Greek word for thief is κλέφτης. When translated into English, this term refers to a bandit, lifter or robber. Character traits include going into a stealth mode, taking something of value when no one is looking. In the biblical case of Judas Iscariot, he was the treasurer of Jesus’ earthly ministry. As donations began to flow in following a plethora of miracles, some scholars have suggested that Judas began to skim off the top prior to betraying Jesus.

When angry, do not sin; do not ever let your wrath (your exasperation, your fury or indignation) last until the sun goes down. 27 Leave no [such] room or foothold for the devil [give no opportunity to him]. 28 Let the thief steal no more, but rather let him be industrious, making an honest living with his own hands, so that he may be able to give to those in need, Ephesians 4:26-28.

In a letter to the Church at Ephesus, the apostle Paul unveils a spiritual mastermind. Like the Joker in Batman, this archenemy will do anything in his power to win at all costs. If you go back and examine Matthew 4:1-11, this is exactly what the Devil does to trick Jesus into giving into temptation. Despite this failed attempt, every day the thief steals from followers of Christ. Using a series of subtle forms of compromise, the Devil is bent on seeing people of faith fall away from God.

The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance (to the full, till it overflows)., John 10:10.

The disciple whom Jesus loved uses a similar expression to warn first century followers of this spiritual thief. As the ruler of the air, Ephesians 2:2, the Devil has 3 main objectives daily. First, to steal the word of God sown in a new believer’s heart, Matthew 13:19. Second, to kill the dreams of those seeking to reach self-actualization, Jeremiah 29:11. Finally, to destroy any spiritual relationship, Luke 10:38-42, that will help uplift you when you fail. Regardless of your current circumstances, let the thief steal no more by covering your friends with a hedge of protection via prayer.

by Jay Mankus

Man Verses Self

Nine years ago, I entered my first Screenwriter’s contest. Like a fish out of a water, I have stumbled my way through the past decade, making rookie mistakes without even realizing it. Yet, 2021 has served as a year of enlightenment, opening up my eyes to crucial techniques that separate a mere novice from a professional screen writer. As I work on my latest project for the 2021 Nicholls Fellowship Screenplay Competition, there is an internal battle brewing within my mind. I find myself caught somewhere in between Man verses self, who I want to become and what I need to change to reach my self-actualization as a writer.

For I do not understand my own actions [I am baffled, bewildered]. I do not practice or accomplish what I wish, but I do the very thing that I loathe [which my moral instinct condemns]. 16 Now if I do [habitually] what is contrary to my desire, [that means that] I acknowledge and agree that the Law is good (morally excellent) and that I take sides with it, Romans 7:15-16.

The origin of Man verses Self comes from a literary form of story. This is brought to life when a character is their own adversary. In these types of parables, an individual possesses a bad habit, flaw, or weakness that prevents this person from reaching their full potential. My current project is based upon my own severe speech impediment as a child. Subsequently, whenever I tried to express feelings in my heart or thoughts within my mind, fits of stammering and stuttering always shut these conversations down. The more frustrated I became, the worse my condition got, causing me to become my own worst enemy.

However, it is no longer I who do the deed, but the sin [principle] which is at home in me and has possession of me. 18 For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh. I can will what is right, but I cannot perform it. [I have the intention and urge to do what is right, but no power to carry it out.] – Romans 7:17-18.

In a letter to the Church at Corinth, the apostle Paul opens up about a private matter. Paul refers to a thorn in the flesh, either a physical ailment or a metaphor for an ongoing spiritual condition. Apparently, Paul’s struggles was not isolated, extending for years. Paul devotes an entire chapter to highlight mankind’s internal tug of war between the carnal nature and God’s promised Counselor, John 14:26. No matter how disciplined and strong that you may be, Paul was not able to control his sinful nature in Romans 7. Thus, Man verses Self is more than a literary form, it’s a journey of faith that forces Christian’s to confront the dirty laundry of their past. The Bible’s advice to conquer any internal struggle is by crucifying your old self and replacing it with the newness of living in Christ, Colossians 3:1-9.

by Jay Mankus

Removing the Element of Doubt

There are 72 accounts in the Bible that mention doubt. This feeling of uncertainty prevents human beings from achieving their full potential. This is what Abraham Maslow calls self-actualization, reaching the top of the pyramid as our hierarchy of needs are met. One of the greatest barriers standing in our way is doubt. Jesus said to first century followers, “a lack of belief is keeping you from a mountain top experience,” Matthew 21:18-22. Meanwhile, Jesus’ earthly brother refers to doubt as a series of crashing waves, propelled by strong winds.

Now the wife of a son of the prophets cried to Elisha, Your servant my husband is dead, and you know that your servant feared the Lord. But the creditor has come to take my two sons to be his slaves. Elisha said to her, What shall I do for you? Tell me, what have you [of sale value] in the house? She said, Your handmaid has nothing in the house except a jar of oil. Then he said, Go around and borrow vessels from all your neighbors, empty vessels—and not a few. And when you come in, shut the door upon you and your sons. Then pour out [the oil you have] into all those vessels, setting aside each one when it is full, 2 Kings 4:1-4.

The aftermath of the Coronavirus has taken a toll on small businesses across the country. The dreams of many hopeful entrepreneurs have been dashed, leading many in the same position of the woman in the passage above. Down to her last jar of oil, this woman was desperate, just hoping to survive. The solution to her problem didn’t sound too promising, collecting as many empty containers from her neighbors as possible. Yet, similar to Jesus’ first miracle, turning water into wine, the oil inside of her only jar kept flowing.

So she went from him and shut the door upon herself and her sons, who brought to her the vessels as she poured the oil. When the vessels were all full, she said to her son, Bring me another vessel. And he said to her, There is not a one left. Then the oil stopped multiplying. Then she came and told the man of God. He said, Go, sell the oil and pay your debt, and you and your sons live on the rest, 2 Kings 4:5-7.

According to a Charles Schwab’s 2019 financial study, 59% of Americans live pay check to check. Another 2019 survey discovered that 65% of Americans own their own home. Depending upon your current financial status, future goals may need to be altered. Yet, until the element of doubt is removed, you’ll never reach your full potential. This is where faith must swoop in to replace doubt. When lingering thoughts of doubt chip away at one’s inner confidence, a belief in the power of the Holy Spirit is crucial to removing the element of doubt. In the passage above, debts were paid off and retirement became a reality. Just believe!

by Jay Mankus

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