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Form Without Function

Function is the basis for an act, serving as the bridge to your ultimate purpose.  Unfortunately, if you find yourself overwhelmed by a hectic schedule, many carry on with their daily routines without any meaningful reflection.  Anyone who allows the busyness of life to consume their soul, you may end up as a prime example of form without function.

What is the benefit, my fellow believers, if someone claims to have faith but has no [good] works [as evidence]? Can that [kind of] faith save him? [No, a mere claim of faith is not sufficient—genuine faith produces good works, James 2:14.

At some point following his brother’s death, James began to re-evaluate his belief system.  The life, death and resurrection of Jesus challenged his tradition view of Judaism.  The concept of a Messiah was believed to be part of the end times.  Yet, Jesus taught James that faith must be accompanied by good works inspired by love.  Without any external change by displaying fruits of the Spirit, you are merely form without function.

If a brother or sister is without [adequate] clothing and lacks [enough] food for each day, 16 and one of you says to them, “Go in peace [with my blessing], [keep] warm and feed yourselves,” but he does not give them the necessities for the body, what good does that do? 17 So too, faith, if it does not have works [to back it up], is by itself dead [inoperative and ineffective], James 2:15-17.

While observing religious practices for most of his life, it appears James was simply going through the motions, without a relationship with God, Romans 10:9-10.  Jesus’ lifestyle slowly convicted James’ heart, making him realize that his faith was dead, inoperative.  Following the commandments, praying and worshipping God is merely a to do list, a spiritual checklist.  Seeing the error of his way, James writes to first century Christians to encourage believers to activate their faith.  The love of Jesus is the form in which faith is meant to function.  May this lesson revive and rejuvenate your soul.

by Jay Mankus

 

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