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Tag Archives: middle class

Learning to Digest Tough Meat

Some cuts of meat are naturally tougher than others.  Depending upon the amount of muscle, connective tissue, and fat, pieces of meat will vary from tender to tough.  Brisket, chuck roast, round and shank cuts of meat are tough to chew.  Meanwhile, Porterhouse, rib-eyes, sirloin and T-bone steak cuts are tender. The toughest cuts of meat have a lot of connective tissue and come from a heavily exercised muscle.  While the wealthy may skip these types of cuts completely, middle class meat lovers need to learn how to chew and digest tough meat.

So put aside every trace of malice and all deceit and hypocrisy and envy and all slander and hateful speech; like newborn babies [you should] long for the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may be nurtured and grow in respect to salvation [its ultimate fulfillment], if in fact you have [already] tasted the goodness and gracious kindness of the Lord, 1 Peter 2:1-3.

One of Jesus’ disciples uses the analogy of a newborn baby to illustrate a spiritual truth.  At birth infants are dependent upon their mothers, relying on breast milk as their only source of food.  Over the first few years of life, mothers will eventually wean their children off of breast milk to transition toward fruit and vegetables.  As babies grow and mature into children, teeth will enable them to learn how to chew and digest meat.  To avoid the threat of choking, parents usually take their time, allowing children to slowly perfect the art of chewing meat before swallowing.

Therefore let us get past the elementary stage in the teachings about the Christ, advancing on to maturity and perfection and spiritual completeness, [doing this] without laying again a foundation of repentance from dead works and of faith toward God, of teaching about washings (ritual purifications), the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment. [These are all important matters in which you should have been proficient long ago.] And we will do this [that is, proceed to maturity], if God permits. For [it is impossible to restore to repentance] those who have once been enlightened [spiritually] and who have tasted and consciously experienced the heavenly gift and have shared in the Holy Spirit, and have tasted and consciously experienced the good word of God and the powers of the age (world) to come, and then have fallen away—it is impossible to bring them back again to repentance, since they again nail the Son of God on the cross [for as far as they are concerned, they are treating the death of Christ as if they were not saved by it], and are holding Him up again to public disgrace, Hebrews 6:1-6.

The Old Testament uses the phrase to chew the cud to encourage believers to meditate upon the Word of God, slowing digesting the context and meaning of biblical words.  The New Testament compares eating meat to spiritual maturity.  The older you become, the more your life should reflect spiritual development and growth.  Yet, when responding to first century questions asked by his disciples, Jesus never gives someone an answer.  Rather, Jesus forces his followers to think for themselves with an end goal of becoming spiritually mature, Matthew 9:10-13.  However, when individuals backslide in their faith, reverting to basic elementary teachings, God expects more.  The Bible is full of complex and difficult teachings that require time to digest.  Therefore, if you want to reach your full potential as a follower of Christ, it’s time to start digesting tough spiritual meat.

by Jay Mankus

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Worthy of Suffering

During my time at the University of Delaware, I was fortunate enough to meet several missionaries.  Through campus groups like Campus Crusade, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Intervarsity, opportunities arose to interact with individuals from different countries, cultures and dynamic characters.  In biblical terms, several of these people I met are worthy of suffering.

The apostles left the Sanhedrin, rejoicing because they had been counted worthy of suffering disgrace for the Name, Acts 5:41.

It’s interesting how people define success in various ways.  The poor may say a good day is having enough money to feed the whole family.  The middle class might suggest its making more than you spend.  Meanwhile, the upper class base success on property, possessions and power.  Yet, for first century Christians, enduring public persecution for their faith was like a badge of courage.

The apostles left the Sanhedrin, rejoicing because they had been counted worthy of suffering disgrace for the Name, 1 Peter 1:7.

Beyond any physical or verbal abuse martyrs experienced, a nugget of truth has been passed on from generation to generation.  While you may suffer for your beliefs, trials serve as a vehicle for growth.  Just as a furnace uses fire to remove imperfections from clay, persecution strengthens faith.  Thus, while the world is dumbfounded by those willing to risk death, imprisonment or public beatings, devout Christians continue to embrace suffering for the sake of Christ.

by Jay Mankus

Desperate for Leadership

If anyone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen cannot love God whom he has not seen, 1 John 4:20.

Most individuals talk a good game, yet when you put their actions under a microscope there isn’t much to be inspired by.  Perhaps a rise in narcissism is to blame, turning a blind eye to reality, living by the mantra, “do as I say, not as I do!”  Unfortunately, a lack of integrity, morality and quality parenting is feeding a generation of self-seekers, cutting corners to get ahead, whatever the cost.

But whoever hates his brother is in the darkness and walks in the darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes, 1 John 2:11.

Meanwhile, the middle class are stuck in the mud, dreaming of brighter days only to wake up to a living nightmare.  Peer pressure, political correctness and those seeking approval often decide to go with the flow, even if its the wrong direction.  The rest of the crowd, standing on the sidelines wait, is hoping a pied piper will come to their rescue.  In the meantime, souls are hungry and thirsting for leadership.

The world cannot hate you, but it hates me because I testify about it that its works are evil, John 7:7.

In the absence of good character, its time for people to take a stand for what they believe.  Jesus knew the world hated him, yet his purpose in life was to fulfill the will of God the Father.  Likewise, the faith community need to get off their couches, find places to serve in their community and show the path for others to follow.  As Jesus once said, “the harvest is ready, but the workers are few.”   Get in the game today while there is still time left on life’s clock.

by Jay Mankus

 

By the Sweat of Your Brow

 

The poor have said, “the rich have won life’s lottery!”  Meanwhile, the middle class are waiting for their big break, a chance for the world to recognize their talents.  On the other hand, the wealthy are trying to keep up with the Joneses, working harder than ever to buy their next show piece.

Whether you are wrestling with poverty, keeping your head above debt or living on cloud 9, everyone makes their living by the sweat of their brow.  Since original sin entered mankind in Genesis 3:17-19, God made life as we know it hard.  Gone are the days of milk and honey, evaporating in a promised land turned to sand.  Like the humidity of a summer sun sapping all your strength, the worries of life can wilt any soul not prepared for unexpected trials.

As I was doing my final touches of yard work before the growing season ends, I was reminded of God’s words in Genesis 3:19.  Yes, even the invincible will experience kryptonite at some point.  This will paralyze your ability to save yourself, leading to the grave, to become like the dust that God formed Adam out of.  In view of this bleak destiny, its vital to make plans for the afterlife, John 14:3.  Therefore, while you have time to breathe, take note of God’s promise in 1 John 5:13-15.  Inquire before you expire.

by Jay Mankus

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