Advertisements
RSS Feed

Tag Archives: mature

Recovering from a Wounded Soul

When the average person begins to feel sick, showing signs of an impending illness, airborne, cold medicine or pain killers are taken to be proactive.  If this action fails to improve your condition, a doctor’s appointment or some sort of check up ensues.  In the worst case scenario, you may even need to be hospitalized.  Yet, when individuals begin to suffer from a broken heart, depression or wounded souls, few react with a sense of urgency.  Thus, society is filled with a spiritual epidemic, unable to recover from a crushed and wounded soul.

The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit, Psalm 34:18.

After Levi decided to leave his career as a tax collector to follow Jesus, joining the other 11 disciples, he threw a party at his home, Matthew 9:9-13.  This guest list included former co-workers, Pharisees and sinners.  When this worldly crowd tried to engage spiritual leaders, a clash of classes developed.  This prompted the Pharisees in attendance to question Jesus’ choice of friends and associates.  Using these concerns for a teachable moment, Jesus deciphered the healthy from the sick.  The disciplined and mature are able to self medicate, managing their own spiritual temperature.  However, the addicted, lost and lonely are in need of a spiritual physician.

He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds, Psalm 147:3.

According to Jesus, healing occurs as individuals begin to recognize their sins and actively seek forgiveness.  Thus, the key to recovering from a wounded soul involves reconciliation with friends, enemies and God.  Matthew 11:25-30 details a call to action for anyone overwhelmed by the worries of this world.  Jesus promises to give rest to the weary if you are willing to lay your burdens at the feet of the cross.  Whenever someone comes to their senses like the prodigal son, consumed by a sense of urgency, wounded souls are refreshed with salvation, Romans 10:9-10.  May this blog serve as a blue print for healing in the future.

by Jay Mankus

Advertisements

Going Through the Door

When I was younger, I weekly told a coach, parent and teacher, I can’t do it.  Trying to take the easy way out, sometimes I was given a pass.  Yet, this mindset leads to co-dependence.  If you want to grow up and mature, at some point you have to go through the door the Lord provides alone.

Behold, I stand at the door and knock; if any one hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me, Revelation 3:20.

In the game show Let’s Make a Deal, current host Wayne Brady often gives contestants three doors to choose from.  One has a grand prize, the other a small prize and the final one a prank for a laugh.  The game of life is similar but decisions replace doors.  Choices are made daily which will shape the outcome of your life for the good or bad.  God doesn’t force individuals to do this or that.  Rather, freewill is offered to walk through the door of your choice.

No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your strength, but with the temptation will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it, 1 Corinthians 10:13.

The apostle Paul wrote a letter to members of a church struggling to overcome specific sins.  Whether he is addressing addicts, bad habits or poor decisions, Paul provide a blue print for conquering addiction.  When tempted God always provides a way out.  Therefore, when evil desires, lust or sinful urges come knocking, walk through the door that the Lord provides.

by Jay Mankus

Where’s the Meat?

In 1984 the Wendy’s Fast Food Chain introduced one of the most memorable advertising slogans of my time, “where’s the beef?”  Actress Clara Peller receives a small burger on a large bun which sets the stage for this classic line.  This commercial convinced customers for a period of time that you had to go to Wendy’s to enjoy a beefy hamburger.

But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil, Hebrews 5:14.

In spiritual houses of worship, there is a similar question asked by hungry souls, “where’s the meat?”  Due to a movement toward entertaining church services, there appears to be more fluff and less detailed teaching.  Thus, many believers are struggling to grow, lacking challenging sermons filled with spiritual meat.

On hearing this, Jesus said, “It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick,” Matthew 9:12.

During a conversation among disciples and Pharisees, Jesus makes an assumption about spiritual growth.  Sooner or later, the spiritually mature must grow up by learning to take care of their own faith.  When you reach this stage in life, you can feed yourself through times of Bible Study, fellowship with other believers and prayer.  As you develop healthy spiritual disciplines, you can find the meat, godly principles, within the Bible daily.

by Jay Mankus

 

Moderation

In ESPN’s latest 30 for 30 documentary, the travails of John Daly are highlighted in Hit it Hard.  Based upon a song written by John, a two time major winner on the PGA Tour, Daly shares his battle with alcohol, gambling and series of failed marriages.  Due to an addictive personality, the concept of moderation is something Daly has has a hard time grasping.

“I have the right to do anything,” you say—but not everything is beneficial. “I have the right to do anything”—but I will not be mastered by anything, 1 Corinthians 6:12.

Whether you are Superman, a professional athlete or an average human being, everyone has a kryptonite.  This condition, element or weakness prevents individuals from reaching their full potential.  Temptation is always lurking, trying to lure people away from good habits and safe environments.  Danger arrives when inner demons convince former addicts that they can handle a situation without God’s help.  This usually results in self-destruction.

Flee from sexual immorality. All other sins a person commits are outside the body, but whoever sins sexually, sins against their own body, 1 Corinthians 6:18.

There are ways to view moderation.  First, some will say that adults should be mature enough to know their limits.  Requiring self-control, this logical approach gives people freedom to develop boundaries.  The second perspective is more cautious, understanding that once you open pandora’s box, there’s no going back.  Either way, unless you have a friend who holds you accountable or a personal relationship with God, the quest for moderation can be a never ending battle.

by Jay Mankus

 

 

 

Reasons to Consider

When Job endured a series of trials and tribulations, each one of his three friends had a different perspective.  Coming from an old school point of God, each believed the Lord was punishing Job for something done in the past or present.  Instead of praying for insight, individuals jump to false conclusions daily, following the the footsteps of Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite and Zophar the Naamathite.

Brothers, do not be children in your thinking. Be infants in evil, but in your thinking be mature, 1 Corinthians 14:20.

As I try to come to grips with my emergency eye surgery, there are some practical explanations.  Maybe I spent too much time on my computer or watched too much television growing up.   Perhaps, poor eating habits are to blame, fueled by a lack of a consistent sleep pattern.  For now I can only speculate, waiting for the Holy Spirit to provide some insight.

“Come now, let us reason together, says the Lord: though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool, Isaiah 1:18.”

When things don’t make sense in life, an Old Testament prophet encourages individuals to reason with God.  This process begins with coming cleaning, confessing any wrong doing that is blocking your relationship with God.  However, acts of contrition must follow repentance.  Sure the why’s may remain a mystery, but the Holy Spirit will provide pieces to the puzzle along the way as you continue to ponder reasons why you experience what you do.

by Jay Mankus

Returning to the Scene of the Crime

In the film Absolute Power, Clint Eastwood plays a jewel thief who witnesses a murder during one of his heists.  When the secret service tries to cover up the president’s affair with a powerful donor’s wife who is now dead, only one person knows the truth.  On the verge of fleeing the country, a press conference infuriates Eastwood who is forced to return to the scene of his crime.

As a dog returns to its vomit, so fools repeat their folly, Proverbs 26:11.

In the spiritual realm, there are some people who tend to repeat the same mistakes over and over again without learning from their consequences.  The wisdom of Solomon relates this individual to a dog who returns to their vomit after throwing up.  This strange behavior is indicative of a fool who does not mature, lured into an addictive cycle that never disappears.

Of them the proverbs are true: “A dog returns to its vomit,” and, “A sow that is washed returns to her wallowing in the mud,” 2 Peter 2:22.

In life, its much easier to run away from the truth and hide than confront the real issue.  While prepared to live the rest of his life off the grid, Clint Eastwood’s conscience urged him to take on the leader of the free world.  Despite the overwhelming odds he faced, Eastwood did the right thing, returning to the scene of the crime and putting back everything he stole.  Whatever situation you are currently facing, may you stand up for justice so that the truth will set you free.

by Jay Mankus

And Then I Three Putted

Golf is one of those hobbies that parallels life.  Sometime you may be right down the middle while others will find you deep into the woods or within a hazard.  Unlike most sports, practice doesn’t always insure progress.  Thus, the game of golf can be cruel causing even professionals to waste an amazing shot with a three putt.

Because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance, James 1:3.

During my final year of coaching high school golf, I drove a par 4 with a 2 iron hybrid.  Unfortunately, when I got to the green, I had a 40 foot putt over a ridge to a hole on the other side going away from me.  Focusing on the line, I forgot to hit the ball hard enough, ending up 1o feet short.  Two putts later this once and a lifetime drive was a distant memory ruined by a three putt.

Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything, James 1:4.

In this life, its common to celebrate prematurely, before a day, round or year is over.  As over confidence or pride lures individuals into a false sense of security, victory is often replaced by defeat.  Thus, before you complete your next competition, project or task, finish strong.  Or else you may be like me, interrupting a moment of glory with the sobering reality, “and then I three putted.”

by Jay Mankus

 

%d bloggers like this: