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Tag Archives: free speech

$Free Speech?

Twitter made it official today: banning the phrase “illegal aliens.”  Twitter officials believe this expression is a form of hate speech.  This social media giant announced on Thursday, September 13th before noon that anyone who tries to use this language in a tweet will be blocked, shadowed banned or have their account deleted.  After hearing this news update, one has to wonder who is deciding what is acceptable and unacceptable?  What criteria, measuring stick or standard is being applied to determine free speech?

And now, Lord, look upon their threats and grant to your servants to continue to speak your word with all boldness, Acts 4:29.

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution may have something to say against Twitter’s decision.  This document prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances.  While Twitter is a private company, future lawsuits by anyone discriminated against could open the door for government regulation of social media sites like a public utility.  Perhaps, this reality caused Twitter to reconsider, reversing their decision Thursday night.

Proclaiming the kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness and without hindrance, Acts 28:31.

During the first century, the Roman Emperor Nero began to attack, imprison and persecute Christians.  In the beginning of the book of Acts, a Jewish zealot named Saul oversaw the execution of the apostle Stephen.  Despite the fear of death, the Holy Spirit emboldened these followers of Christ to fulfill the great commission, Matthew 28:16-20.  These saints didn’t have the luxury of freedom of speech.  Rather, early Christians boldly proclaimed the kingdom of heaven, trusting God to protect them from their enemies.  May modern believers learn from their example, having the conviction to share what is on your heart.

by Jay Mankus

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Putting on Price Tag on a Life

On the day before Palm Sunday, survivors of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting took center stage at protests across the country.  Fighting for stricter gun laws in America, students sitting on a stage in Washington D.C. placed visible price tags on their clothing.  According to reporters, these prices were suppose to symbolize the campaign contributions senator Marco Rubio has received from the National Riffle Association.  Suggesting this representative from Florida cares more about guns than children, this political stunt put a price tag on a life.

For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it, Matthew 16:25.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, 1.21 million lives were ended prematurely in 2008.  The culprit of this suppressed killer were abortions performed in the United States.  Typically, two to four percent of these unwanted pregnancies are due to rape and incest.  Based upon a 2016 article written by Robert Johnston, 30 % of abortions occur due to socio-economic conditions.  The number one reason why abortions took place two years ago was for a quick fix, birth control.  This is the unseen price placed on unwanted babies in the United States.

For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord, Romans 6:23.

One of the great things about living in America is free speech, having the freedom to protest.  This same thing applies to the spiritual realm, able to exercise free will.  During my wife Leanne’s third pregnancy, she had numerous complications.  After a false alarm visit to the emergency room, one doctor suggested that terminating my daughter’s life prematurely was the best option.  Without any hesitation, Leanne and I understood the gift of life is priceless.  Thirteen years later, my daughter Lydia is healthy, blessed and will play her first high school golf match on Tuesday.  May this blog remind you that you can’t put a price tag on life.

by Jay Mankus

 

The Value of a Statue

Ancient Greece memorialized their heroes by erecting statues of gods and goddesses throughout cities like Athens.  When visitors passed through the streets, these monuments served as a reminder of their importance within the Greek culture.  During a first century mission trip to this region, the apostle Paul took some time to explore before Silas and Timothy arrived.  While waiting for his friends, Paul became overwhelmed by the images he observed.  Despite being offended, Paul desperately sought to engage the citizens of Greece, searching for something, anything they shared in common.

While Paul was waiting for them in Athens, he was greatly distressed to see that the city was full of idols, Acts 17:16.

Although Paul does not give an actual number of statues that he witnessed, it appears to be in the hundreds.  As a former Pharisee, the zealot within him immediately thinks of these statues as idols, breaking the second commandment within the Torah, You shall not make for yourself a carved image—any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them,” Exodus 20:4.  However, the teaching of Jesus moved Paul to put a positive spin on what he saw, calling a crowd of Greeks religious.  This compliment opens the door to allow Paul to introduce philosophers to the unknown God based upon an altar erected by a former citizen.

Paul then stood up in the meeting of the Areopagus and said: “People of Athens! I see that in every way you are very religious.  For as I walked around and looked carefully at your objects of worship, I even found an altar with this inscription: to an unknown god. So you are ignorant of the very thing you worship—and this is what I am going to proclaim to you,” Acts 17:22-23.

Sure, every culture possesses something that is offensive.  Whether this is a document, religious background or statue, history is meant to educate individuals, not divide citizens.  The United States of America was founded on the principle of free speech earning the nickname back in the 1970’s as the great American melting pot.  The first amendment of the Bill of Rights declares Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.  This is what makes America great.  However, if the citizens of this country allow government officials to destroy or remove historic statues of the past, there were will nothing to warn us from making the same mistakes.  May the events of Charlottesville in August of 2017 help people see the real value of a statue.

by Jay Mankus

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