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Tag Archives: Caesar Augustus

A Family Christmas

The origin of Christmas is based upon the words found in the gospel of Luke 2:1-7.  In a sense, the census issued by Caesar Augustus forced a family reunion of sorts.  However, in this case, “everyone went to his own town to register,” Luke 2:3, back to your home town where relatives were born and raised.  Thus, Mary and Joseph rode on a donkey from Nazareth to Bethlehem nicknamed the City of David creating the first Christmas traffic jam.

Like finding a cheap hotel in Dover, Delaware during Race Weekend, Joseph didn’t have a prayer.  With the odds stacked against him, Joseph begged, pleaded and sought out a hole in the wall motel.  This dive was filled with manure, cold drafts and the constant noise of animals.  Yet, in this desolate place, the world welcomed a Savior, who came to seek and to save that which was lost, Luke 19:10.  When the shepherds arrived, the first Christmas concert was performed by angels, praising God for the miracle of life.

Today, Christmas has become a day where families reunite, if only for a day, meal or weekend.  Putting the past behind, its a time of reflection, thanksgiving and worship.  Despite the distractions of parades, sporting events and more shopping, Christmas wouldn’t be the same without family.  Maybe this is why death, divorce and orphans struggle to find peace on this sacred day.  Regardless of where this holiday may lead you in 2013, let me be the first to say, “Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night!”

by Jay Mankus

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Killing Jesus

According to the most recent New York Times Best Sellers list for the first week of October, 2013, Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard’s book Killing Jesus has reached number one.  O’Reilly’s latest novel follows in the footsteps of his 2011 project Killing Lincoln, which remained a best seller for 65 weeks.  While this new project focuses on the historical events leading up to Jesus’ death on a cross, my blog serves as a reminder of how the American media is successfully killing Jesus from modern history books.

jesus on cross photo: Jesus Cross.jpg

Based upon my research using theology books, Jesus was born sometime between 4 and 5 BC, using the decree made by Caesar Augustus for a census for the entire Roman world as a reference point, Luke 2:1-3.  Since Joseph and Mary were on the run. fleeing Jerusalem from King Herod’s slaughter of boys 2 years and under, hiding in Egypt until his death, Matthew 2:13-15, the term Anno Domini was introduced when Jesus returned to Israel in Nazareth, Matthew 2:23.  Despite the rise and fall of empires, history has used Before Christ and in the year of our Lord, the English translation for AD, for thousands of years.  Until recently, Jesus’ place in time was secure.

jesus on cross photo: Jesus on_the_cross.jpg

As educational institutions continue to hire Atheists, Marxists and Socialists as professors, Jesus has been killed, erased and omitted from modern textbooks.  Relying on the Gregorian Calender, which is influenced by international groups like the United Nations, Before Common Era (B.C.E.) and Common Era (C.E.) have now replaced Before Christ and Anno Domini.  The National Education Association, also known as the N.E.A. has adopted this view, removing the traces of Jesus from history books.  These were like the first lashings Jesus received, prior to carrying the cross to a hill on the north side of Jerusalem.

In 1985, the Jesus Seminars appeared on the scene, inspired by Robert Funk, designed and formed by the Westar Institute.  Under the guise of a biblical movement, this phenomena follows in the foot steps of the Gnostic Gospels, written a few hundred years after the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.  The scary aspect of this movement is their 4 colored bead system.  Red designates what Jesus definitely said, pink represents what Jesus probably said, gray for not original, but like minded comments and black for words Jesus did not say.  If this same scrutiny was applied to the Koran, there would be an uprising among Muslims.  Unfortunately, most churches have remained quiet, allowing Jesus to be mocked, spit on and verbally crucified all over again.

by Jay Mankus

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