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You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet

The expression “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” comes from a song by Canadian rock band Bachman–Turner Overdrive. The phrase “you ain’t heard nothing yet” first appeared in the title of a 1919 song written by Al Jolson and Gus Kahn with the music created by Bud De Sylva. When I recently read the passage below, high gas prices and record inflation is nothing compared to the 7 tribulations that await the earth.

And the stars of the sky dropped to the earth like a fig tree shedding its unripe fruit out of season when shaken by a strong wind. 14 And the [c]sky rolled up like a scroll and vanished, and every mountain and island was dislodged from its place, Revelation 6:13-14.

When I was a child, there was no cable to distract Americans from reality. Rather, most families tuned into the nightly news at 6 and 11pm. When the Home Box Office expanded your viewing options from 5 or 6 channels depending upon your antenna to nearly 1oo in the 1980’s, ratings on the three major networks began to decline. Subsequently, new casts began to shock viewers with extremes and violence.

Then the kings of the earth and their noblemen and their magnates and their military chiefs and the wealthy and the strong and [everyone, whether] slave or free hid themselves in the caves and among the rocks of the mountains, 16 And they called to the mountains and the rocks, Fall on (before) us and hide us from the face of Him Who sits on the throne and from the [d]deep-seated indignation and wrath of the Lamb, Revelation 6:15-16.

When I read the above passage last week, I was stunned by the details in John’s vision. Unlike catastrophe and disaster films that often overdramatize a specific event, John writes about something that will happen in the future. This contains Armageddon with Independence Day and the Day After Tomorrow. According to John, those that survive will seek higher ground, finding shelter within mountain caves. If you study the Bible enough, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

by Jay Mankus

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