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The Origins of Friday the 13th

The Knights Templar was a by product of the crusades during the Middle Ages. While Christians and Moslems fought for control of the city of Jerusalem, a French knight named Hugues de Pavens established the order of the Knights Templar in 1118. During the 12th century, the Knights Templar reached their peak, serving as monks and keepers of historical church artifacts. The demise of the Knights Templar occurred on Friday the 13th, in October of 1307.

The Lord shall send you curses, confusion, and rebuke in every enterprise to which you set your hand, until you are destroyed, perishing quickly because of the evil of your doings by which you have forsaken me [Moses and God as one], Deuteronomy 28:20.

This was a culmination of the extreme measures taken by King Philip IV of France to hunt down, imprison, torture, and execute the leaders of the Knights Templar. This plan was set in motion with Pope Clement V’s backing and support. Months prior to this fateful night, secret documents had been sent by couriers throughout France. These papers included lurid details, whispers of black magic and accusations of scandalous sexual rituals. While being burned at the stake, Roger de Flor, the leader of the Knights Templar, cursed King Philip and Pope Clement.

For he is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain. For he is the servant of God, an avenger who carries out God’s wrath on the wrongdoer, Romans 13:4.

According to eyewitnesses of De Flor’s death, Roger claimed that both men would die within the next year. The Pope died of a severe illness a few months later. Meanwhile, King Philip suffered a stroke while riding a horse several months later, dying shortly afterward. The fulfillment of Roger de Flor’s curse on Friday the 13th is believed to be the origin for this scary night. Today, superstitious people consider Friday the 13th to be unlucky. Yet, curses are real, detailed in the Bible, so make sure you listen carefully to God’s commands, Deuteronomy 28:1-2. Those who do will find blessings; not curses.

by Jay Mankus

When the World Laughs in Your Face

In the film National Treasure, Nicolas Cage plays Benjamin Gates, a treasurer hunter searching for the Knights Templar.  Hidden by the Free Masons, Gates tries to unlock clues left behind and revealed by his grand father.  However, in the professional arena Gates is considered a joke, a dreamer who is chasing after something that doesn’t exist.  To make matters worse, government officials laughed at him when he warns that the Declaration of Independence is in danger.

Some, however, made fun of them and said, “They have had too much wine,” Acts 2:13.

On the day of Pentecost, Peter and the disciples met a similar fate.  As the residents of Jerusalem listened to these Jewish leaders speak in tongues, a group individuals jumped to a conclusion, suggesting these men are merely drunk.  Empowered by this spiritual presence, Peter says “at 9 in the morning, I don’t think so?”  Despite this come back, I’m sure not everyone was convinced.  Thus, whenever you encounter critics, all you can do is trust what you believe by living out your faith.

These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed, 1 Peter 1:7.

If the creative, dreamers or visionaries stopped pursuing their calling due to other people’s opinions, the world would lose its artists, inventors and future leaders.  Like the apostles of the book of Acts, the Holy Spirit is an essential force to continue on regardless of whatever others may think.  Therefore, don’t overreact if joking, laughing or mocking ensues.  Rather, hold fast to your beliefs, roll with the punches and strive to fulfill God’s plan for your life.

by Jay Mankus

 

 

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