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Tag Archives: Thanksgiving and Christmas

Finding Fulfillment in Family

Like anyone on the wrong side of 50, I find myself attending more funerals the older I get. Last weekend, I paid my last respects to two members of the Hanson family. The matriarch, Aunt Peg, who lived more than a century and her son John who passed away suddenly in January. Death is never a reason to celebrate, but it does give family members a chance to come together, mourn and find a way to press on with the rest of their lives.

Therefore encourage (admonish, exhort) one another and edify (strengthen and build up) one another, just as you are doing. 12 Now also we beseech you, brethren, get to know those who labor among you [recognize them for what they are, acknowledge and appreciate and respect them all]—your leaders who are over you in the Lord and those who warn and kindly reprove and exhort you, 1 Thessalonians 5:11-12.

As a child, I was annoyed anytime I was forced to visit relatives at Thanksgiving and Christmas. As I became a teenager, I was skeptical about this annual tradition. Between the numbers of people cramped into one house and packed at a large dining room table, I found it hard to really get to know my cousins. Everything seemed so superficial and rushed, going through the motions without developing any permanent meaningful lasting relationships.

And let us consider and give attentive, continuous care to watching over one another, studying how we may stir up (stimulate and incite) to love and helpful deeds and noble activities, 25 Not forsaking or neglecting to assemble together [as believers], as is the habit of some people, but admonishing (warning, urging, and encouraging) one another, and all the more faithfully as you see the day approaching, Hebrews 10:24-25.

Yet, this past weekend I found fulfillment in family. Instead of flying in for a funeral and flying out the next day, we spent four days in the mid-west. The first day was spent at Great America, the next golfing with lunch afterward, followed by golf and a series of meals out on the third with a relaxing final day. Each of these events provided one on one time with different individuals. Before the weekend ended, I felt like I became part of the Hanson family. This is what is possible when family time is stretched out instead of jamming everything into one or two days a year.

by Jay Mankus

More Than A Feat… It’s a Way of Life

Prior to Fed Ex, UPS and the United States Postal Services, important messages were delivered by a single individual.  Some traveled by boat, others used horses and during the Industrial Revolution via train.  However, in the Old Testament, messengers relied on less conventional methods, camels, donkeys or sandals by foot.  Perhaps, this explains the comment below by a prophet upon receiving good news.

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns,” Isaiah 52:7.

The New Testament refers to feet in the context of spiritual armor.  One of the pieces of Roman armor consisted of special shoes with cleats to dig into the ground.  This enabled soldiers to stand their ground when attacked.  The symbolism of these shoes suggests that when your footing is secure, your feet are ready to deliver the gospel of peace.  As faith matures, individuals develop a spiritual hunger, eager to spread the good news about Jesus Christ.

And having strapped on your feet the gospel of peace in preparation [to face the enemy with firm-footed stability and the readiness produced by the good news], Ephesians 6:15.

To a certain extent, the content of your daily conversations reveal your spiritual readiness.  If you are like me, I experience many ebbs and flows, often hot and cold spiritually.  As you open your mouth, what message are you delivering?  Is it demoralizing, encouraging or lame?  Are you positive, negative or somewhere in between?  As Thanksgiving and Christmas approaches, strap on your spiritual shoes so that no one misses the reason for this upcoming season.

by Jay Mankus

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