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You Can’t Quantify Feelings

Science is based upon the collection of data. This information is accumulated through a series of experiments using trial and error to quantify the difference between fact and fiction. Quantify refers to assessing, calculating, evaluating, gauging, sizing up and weighing the results. Theories are developed and formed based upon observing similar outcomes over and over again. One thing that scientists all agree on is that you can’t quantify feelings.

The heart is deceitful above all things, and it is exceedingly perverse and corrupt and severely, mortally sick! Who can know it [perceive, understand, be acquainted with his own heart and mind]? 10 I the Lord search the mind, I try the heart, even to give to every man according to his ways, according to the fruit of his doings, Jeremiah 17:9-10.

One Old Testament prophets warns Jews of the dangers of feelings. If human hearts are deceitful, you can’t trust your feelings to be accurate. According to Jeremiah, hearts and minds can play tricks on you, resulting in waves of emotions. Meanwhile, feelings are temporary, often fleeting and fading from one thing to the next. Unless you are in love, feelings tend to change like the weather.

Now faith is the assurance (the confirmation, the title deed) of the things [we] hope for, being the proof of things [we] do not see and the conviction of their reality [faith perceiving as real fact what is not revealed to the senses], Hebrews 11:1.

Since you can’t quantify feelings, the author of Hebrews reveals how faith is the vehicle designed to take the place of feelings. Faith serves as assurance like a spiritual heart beat to keep Christians going. When hope is absent or invisible, faith is the foundation for belief in God’s existence. While feelings often end in disappointment, living by faith and not by sight encourages others to do the same. When faith is lived out daily, blind hope can be quantified.

by Jay Mankus

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