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Inveterate Murmurers

In the 2004 film I Robot, Bridget Moynahan plays a robotic scientist who uses big words that Will Smith struggles to understand. While reading the book of Jude, I came across the term inveterate. This refers to having a particular habit, activity, or interest that is long-established and unlikely to change: Based upon the context of the passage below, this behavior has become a way of life.

These are inveterate murmurers (grumblers) who complain [of their lot in life], going after their own desires [controlled by their passions]; their talk is boastful and arrogant, [and they claim to] admire men’s persons and pay people flattering compliments to gain advantage, Jude 1:16.

During the first century, a few decades following the ascension of Jesus into heaven, the joy of many Christians had faded. According to Jude, too many church going individuals began to complain about their life. Rather than find a reason to celebrate life, negativity began to blind Christians from seeing their lives as half full. Subsequently, gossip and murmurs spread like gangrene within Christian communities.

For the rest, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is worthy of reverence and is honorable and seemly, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely and lovable, whatever is kind and winsome and gracious, if there is any virtue and excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think on and weigh and take account of these things [fix your minds on them], Philippians 4:8.

In a letter to the Church at Philippi, the apostle Paul provided a solution for inveterate murmurers. Instead of allowing your soul to become consumed by anxiety and stress, focus on the positive aspects of your life. While the current economy and price of gas may be hard to overlook, fix your minds on whatever is true and pure. As you meditate upon the good things in your life, you can break free from the bad habits of your past. May this blog lift your spirits and point you in the right direction.

by Jay Mankus

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