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Recognize, Perceive and Understand

A coincidence is a remarkable concurrence of events or circumstances without apparent causal connection. Over several decades of attending church, I’ve heard pastors refer to God instances where the hand of God is perceived to perform a miracle. Prior to 1555, the Bible did not contain individual verses. These were added to the Vulgate Bible to help readers identity memorable portions of a book.

By this we come to know (progressively to recognize, to perceive, to understand) the [essential] love: that He laid down His [own] life for us; and we ought to lay [our] lives down for [those who are our] brothers [[l]in Him], 1 John 3:16.

Everyone knows about John 3:16’s popularity as one of the most iconic verses in the Bible. However, do you recognize, perceive or understand a commonality between John 3:16 and 1 John 3:16? The latter is quoting the words of Jesus addressed to a first century Pharisee named Nicodemus. The passage above serves as a reminder so that you recognize, perceive, and understand God’s love for you.

 For God so greatly loved and dearly prized the world that He [even] gave up His only begotten ([d]unique) Son, so that whoever believes in (trusts in, clings to, relies on) Him shall not perish (come to destruction, be lost) but have eternal (everlasting) life, John 3:16.

As I write blogs today, the Holy Spirit urges me to remind my readers of key biblical principles. I often question with a whisper, “are you sure you want me to address this again?” While you may be aware of certain biblical truths, using a new context or illustration often drives home this point in a more powerful way. This is the purpose of 1 John 3:16: serving as a clear reminder of John 3:16-17 so that another generation of Christians will understand the unconditional love of God.

by Jay Mankus

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