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A Faith Graft

Sir Archibald Hector McIndoe was a pioneering New Zealand plastic surgeon. While serving in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, McIndoe greatly improved the treatment and rehabilitation of badly burned soldiers. This research set the stage for the very first skin graft performed on Jordan Welborn. Skin grafts are a surgical procedure in which a piece of healthy skin is transplanted to a new part of the body.

Consequently, from now on we estimate and regard no one from a [purely] human point of view [in terms of natural standards of value]. [No] even though we once did estimate Christ from a human viewpoint and as a man, yet now [we have such knowledge of Him that] we know Him no longer [in terms of the flesh], 2 Corinthians 5:16.

One of my former high school students was in a freak skate boarding accident. Due to the severe damage done to his leg, numerous skin grafts were performed just to save his leg. This was the first time that I heard about search this type of operation. After two years of physical therapy, this teenager was finally able to resume a somewhat normal life. Sometimes it takes a worst case scenario to begin seeking a faith graft.

Therefore if any person is [ingrafted] in Christ (the Messiah) he is a new creation (a new creature altogether); the old [previous moral and spiritual condition] has passed away. Behold, the fresh and new has come! – 2 Corinthians 5:17

The difference between a faith and skin graft is that a relationship with God is planted firmly. Instead of moving skin from one place to another, Jesus is established, interwoven within your heart and soul. This transformation takes time for the new creature in Christ to replace your old self. As individuals draw near to God in prayer and worship, a faith graft is conceived. The more you read and study the Bible, faith becomes natural.

by Jay Mankus

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