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What Happened to Being Honest?

On May 25th, George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota when white police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly 10 minutes. This one act of hatred has ignited a series of protests and riots over the past 2 weeks. As Americans still stuck under state induced quarantines watched helplessly from home, anger was unleashed upon buildings, businesses and vacant malls across the country. As citizens began to express their concerns and opinions on social media, the Cancel Culture movement has risen up to condemn, punish and silence those who deviate from mainstream progressive ideology.

But in your hearts set Christ apart as holy [and acknowledge Him] as Lord. Always be ready to give a logical defense to anyone who asks you to account for the hope that is in you, but do it courteously and respectfully, 1 Timothy 3:15.

As each day passes, the backlash against honest tweets continues. The first victim of this backlash was Sacramento Kings Play by Play announcer Grant Napear. Napear was fired by his radio station and forced to resign from his 22 year position with the Kings all because he replied to a tweet “All Lives Matter.” The next was New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees who made a statement about honoring the flag in an interview during Memorial Day Weekend. While Brees wasn’t cut by the Saints, he was shamed into apologizing for expressing his heart felt beliefs about patriotism. James Bennet of the New York Times was forced to resign after agreeing to print an Opinion Editorial written by conservative Senator Tom Cotton.

[And see to it that] your conscience is entirely clear (unimpaired), so that, when you are falsely accused as evildoers, those who threaten you abusively and revile your right behavior in Christ may come to be ashamed [of slandering your good lives]. 17 For [it is] better to suffer [unjustly] for doing right, if that should be God’s will, than to suffer [justly] for doing wrong, 1 Peter 3:16-17.

One of Jesus’ disciples made an interesting observation in the first century. After publicly denying knowing Jesus, Peter is restored in John 21:15-19. This conversation seems to have empowered Peter to become a spiritual rock, eager to share his faith after Jesus rose from the dead. However, Peter adds a disclaimer, when you do share your faith, you may suffer. Although Peter doesn’t specify what kind of suffering, it appears to be socially. In other words, you won’t be the most popular person, but when you’re criticized for doing the right thing, it’s worth the backlash. I don’t know how long this trend will continue, but when you do express your beliefs, do so with a gentle, courteous and respectful spirit.

by Jay Mankus

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