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Watch That Thought

The origin of “loose lips sink ships” was coined as a slogan during WWII.  This idea was developed by the US Office of War Information.  The goal of this slogan was to limit the possibility of people inadvertently giving useful information to enemy spies.  Thus, the initial phrase read “loose lips might sink ships.”

If anyone does not obey what we say in this letter, take note of that person, and have nothing to do with him, that he may be ashamed, 2 Thessalonians 3:14.

According to a first century doctor, Thessalonica developed a shady reputation.  When a couple of Jews were offended by the apostle Paul’s initial message, a group of bullies were gathered up to interrupt Paul’s speech.  Acts 17:5 refers to several lowlifes and thugs who formed a mob.  Due to the dangerous conditions, Paul and Barnabas were sent away at dark to escape to Berea.  When you verbalize your emotions and feelings, loose words are bound to come out of your mouth.

Now these people were more noble and open-minded than those in Thessalonica, so they received the message [of salvation through faith in the Christ] with great eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so, Acts 17:11.

After watching the stark contrast between these two cities, Luke is compelled to illustrate the qualities that made the Bereans noble.  First, instead of overreacting to a new concept, teaching or thought, be open minded.  Second, after listening intently to a foreign idea, examine the Scriptures to see if this is accurate, true.  Therefore, the next time you have the urge to open your mouth prematurely, watch that thought by following in the footsteps of the Bereans.

by Jay Mankus

 

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