Advertisements
RSS Feed

Too Many Pinocchios and Not Enough Average Joes

The Adventures of Pinocchio was first published in 1883 by Italian author Carlo Collodi.  Disney released the animated version of Pinocchio in 1940.  This puppet created by the woodcarver Geppetto serves as the protagonist of this film.  Magically brought to life, Pinocchio discovers a shocking reality about truth.  Each time Pinocchio tells a lie, the size of his nose immediately grows.  This standard has been adopted  by members of the media to illustrate the honest from those who distort the truth.

Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord, but those who act faithfully are his delight, Proverbs 12:22.

Unfortunately, when you place a camera in front of most politicians, exaggerations, fake outrage and misleading statements flow.  When you add political talking points to this equation, the concept of cable news panels is becoming a pointless exercise.  If experts, guests and hosts are merely going to regurgitate what their side believes to be true, all you have each night in America for evening news is political spin, often void of truth.  This cycle goes on and on with too many Pinocchios and not enough average Joes.

A false witness will not go unpunished, and he who breathes out lies will perish, Proverbs 19:9.

In his 1990 album The Great Exchange, Bruce Carroll released the song Average Joe.  The lyrics refer to an average American family at the time, hard working, church attending and God fearing.  The chorus sings about the power of God flowing through the lives of averages Joes.  Back in the early nineties, this song was considered normal, socially acceptable.  Nearly, thirty years later, progressive ideas has labeled this concept as divisive, judgmental and non-inclusive.  Unless modern Pinocchios are exposed, held accountable and removed from power, average families are in danger of disappearing, shamed into conforming to the ways of the world.

by Jay Mankus

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: