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The National Anthem, 9/11 and Professional Sports

When I was in high school, the National Anthem had become passe.  Sure, the sporting events that I attended played an old version on a lame sound system, but it was tradition.  Unfortunately, this continued without much meaning, unless of course you were contending for a championship or title.  Like standing for the pledge of allegiance at the beginning of the school day, playing the National Anthem before a sporting event is what you did.

So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets, Matthew 7:12.

On September 11th, 2001, I was just about to head into work when I received a delivery from UPS.  Without any introduction, this man proclaimed, “the twin towers are on fire.!”  Surprised, I replied, “what?”  As soon as he left,  I turned on the television, watching in awe.  Every week I traveled up to East Rutherford, New Jersey for work, greeted by these towers in the skyline each time I arrived.  A couple of weeks earlier I made a special delivery to the John Hancock building.  After these two buildings fell to the ground, the tradition of the National Anthem became more than just a song.  This one minute and thirty second song became a way to honor, remember and respect those who have died serving America.

Honor everyone. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the emperor, 1 Peter 2:17.

One of the perks of my father’s job when I grew up in Delaware was that his company bought season tickets for the Philadelphia Flyers and Phillies.  When there weren’t any clients in town to entertain, the family was able to attend games a few times a month.  In 1987, my dad scored tickets to Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final.  To inspire the crowd, Lauren Hart sang God Bless America, the song Kate Smith made famous singing at sporting events.  Although the Flyers lost this game and the series 4 games to 3, I still get chills when I think about the Spectrum rocking at the end of this anthem.  When you put the National Anthem, 9/11 and professional sporting events together, you get a recipe for honor, patriotism and time to pay respect to the veterans of the USA.

by Jay Mankus

 

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